Sunnyfields Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
258
AGES
3 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Community school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
020 8359 2000

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(17/1/17)
Full Report - All Reports
76%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Hatchcroft
Off Greyhound Hill
Hendon
London
NW4 4JH
02082033113

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You, school leaders and governors have created a nurturing, supportive and harmonious school, where pupils can thrive academically and emotionally. Under your leadership, the school has achieved the accolade of the Unicef Level 2 Rights Respecting award and this work permeates throughout the culture of the school community. Pupils are very proud of their school and the support and respect they show to each other. They relish the opportunities to act as ‘Junior Travel Ambassadors’ (JTAs), ‘Mediators’ and ‘Playground Friends’. These roles help them to develop their leadership skills and provide guidance and care for others. Pupils mix well together in this diverse environment, are keen to learn and their behaviour is of a consistently high standard. You know your school well and work tirelessly to make continual improvements, so that all pupils have equal access to a good standard of education. You meticulously track pupils’ progress, and as a team have identified that some children and pupils do not make the same substantial progress as others. While collectively all pupils achieve much higher than the national average and make excellent progress, some groups of pupils could do better. These include boys in the early years and key stage 1, some disadvantaged pupils across the school, the most able and some girls in mathematics at key stage 2. Already, the specific actions you have introduced to combat this are having a positive impact on the progress these groups make. As a result, current pupils across the school are making at least good progress. You have successfully addressed the areas for improvement identified during the inspection in March 2011. By the end of key stage 2, your pupils now make much better progress and attain higher standards in mathematics than pupils nationally. You have developed the early years provision, enhancing the environment and investing in resources to support children’s learning. As a result, the proportion of children achieving a good level of development over time has increased and is now just above the national average. However, you are not complacent. You have identified that more needs to be done to strengthen the links between the nursery and reception class, so that children can make even faster progress. Safeguarding is effective. You, your leaders, and governors have ensured that all safeguarding arrangements meet statutory requirements. You have created a culture that prioritises the safeguarding of all children and pupils. You know the individual needs of each child and work closely with their families to ensure that, if needed, early and effective help is readily available. School leaders work collaboratively with external agencies to provide a range of family support and address emerging issues. You carefully check the suitability of staff to work at the school and keep detailed and timely records of any child protection referrals. Staff receive regular safeguarding training and are vigilant in identifying pupils who are potentially at risk. The majority of staff and some governors have undertaken ‘Prevent’ training. Pupils are given useful information about how they can keep themselves safe, both in school and in the wider community, including online and when travelling to and from school. School leaders have worked hard to create a climate of trust, where pupils readily share their concerns and are confident that they will receive support and help. Pupils were clear that bullying, including name-calling, is exceptionally rare. Pupils enjoy coming to school and are encouraged and rewarded for attending regularly. As a result, attendance has improved over the past few years. Inspection findings While only in post for 18 months, you have quickly gained the support of staff, leaders, parents and governors. You are committed to addressing the disparity between the progress made by different groups of children and pupils across the school. You have a clear vision for how this can be achieved and your actions to date have already had a significant impact. The governing body are experienced, committed and passionate about the school. They too have an accurate understanding of the many strengths of the school and the significant improvements made over time. They are also clear that there is still some disparity between groups of pupils and are working closely with school leaders to eradicate this. They are clear about their statutory responsibilities and are robust in their challenge to school leaders. Many children enter Reception with skills and knowledge typically average for their age. In 2016, the proportion of children who achieved a good level of development remained just above average. However, there have been persistent gaps over time between disadvantaged children and their peers, and with girls outperforming boys, in all areas of learning and development. School leaders are working hard to reduce this. Provision in the early years, both in Nursery and Reception, provides plentiful opportunities for child-initiated activities in a well-resourced and purposeful, indoor and outdoor environment. Children are confident, well behaved and articulate. Staff carefully record children’s progress and work closely with parents to encourage their continued support. Most children are well prepared to enter Year 1 at the end of Reception. However, very few children exceeded the early learning goals, leaving further scope to ensure that the most able children achieve even more. The number of pupils achieving the expected standard in the phonic reading check has been consistently above the national average over the past three years. The school encourages a love of reading through imaginative classroom and corridor areas devoted to reading, an abundance of reading books and initiatives to promote reading. Pupils listened to during the inspection read with enthusiasm and confidence, using a range of strategies to manage unknown vocabulary. Overall, pupils make very good progress across key stage 1, in reading, writing and mathematics, achieving higher than the national average. However, while all groups do better than pupils do nationally, girls continue to attain higher than boys, and disadvantaged pupils do not all do as well as their peers in the school. In 2016, Year 6 pupils made much more progress than pupils did nationally. Boys achieved particularly well and outperformed girls in reading, writing and mathematics. Ensuring that girls achieve as highly as boys in key stage 2 is now a high priority for school leaders. A newly introduced assessment tracking system means that leaders have accurate information about pupils’ progress. As a result, staff are able to intervene more quickly to ensure that all pupils make excellent progress from their starting points. The school’s information on pupils currently on roll shows that any differences are getting smaller. Teachers plan engaging and stimulating activities that encourage pupils to be active participants in their own learning. Pupils are keen to do well and show genuine interest and pride in their work. They take note of the helpful advice and guidance teachers give them on how to improve. The most able pupils enjoy the many opportunities presented by the school. They are highly articulate, keen to learn and aspire to do well. At times, however, activities in class lack challenge. For instance, in mathematics, there is sometimes too much reliance on practising learned skills rather than stretching pupils’ mathematical understanding further by undertaking more reasoning or problemsolving activities. Parents are encouraged to participate fully in the life of the school. For example, through volunteering and attending ‘stay and play’ sessions. Leaders provide informative workshops so that parents can learn helpful strategies to support their child’s learning and development. The majority of those who responded to the online survey Parent View were positive about the progress that their children were making and about the school as a whole. Children in the early years quickly settle into school routines and harder-to-reach families receive good support. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: they continue to implement effective strategies so that all groups of pupils make significant and sustained progress from their starting points the most able pupils, including the most able disadvantaged, are routinely challenged to achieve as well as they should provision in the early years builds on children’s prior learning so that they make greater gains in their learning. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Barnet. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Helen Matthews Her Majesty’s Inspector Information about the inspection The inspector agreed to prioritise the following areas with the school at the start of the inspection: The quality of provision in the early years, particularly for boys and disadvantaged children. The achievement and progress of key stage 1 boys and disadvantaged pupils. The progress of girls in mathematics and reading at key stage 2. The effectiveness of safeguarding arrangements and the attendance of some groups of pupils. The inspector carried out the following activities to explore these areas during the inspection: meetings with the headteacher, the deputy headteacher, assistant headteacher, middle leaders, governors and a representative from the local authority pupils in Years 3 and 4, were heard reading joint visits to classrooms with the headteacher scrutiny of pupils’ work and discussions with pupils informal discussions with parents at the end of the school day consideration of 52 responses to Ofsted’s online survey Parent View, 21 responses to the staff survey and 91 responses to the pupils’ survey an evaluation of documents, including school development plans, reviews, safeguarding information and current pupils’ achievement.

Sunnyfields Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 63% Agree 31% Disagree 0% Strongly Disagree 6% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>63, "agree"=>31, "disagree"=>0, "strongly_disagree"=>6, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017
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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 06-06-2017

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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