Strood Academy
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Secondary
Post 16
PUPILS
1360
AGES
11 - 19
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Academy sponsor led
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
01634 331110

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(24/1/17)
Full Report - All Reports
46%
NATIONAL AVG. 60%
5+ GCSEs grade 9-4 (standard pass or above) including English and maths



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 12% of schools in England) Below Average (About 20% of schools in England) Average (About 37% of schools in England) Above Average (About 17% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 14% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 5% of schools in England) Below Average (About 25% of schools in England) Average (About 48% of schools in England) Above Average (About 17% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 5% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% of pupils who achieved 5+ GCSEs grade 9-4
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% of pupils who achieved GCSE grade 5 or above in both English and maths

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Carnation Road
Strood
Rochester
ME2 2SX
01634717121

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You know your school well and have worked hard at successfully addressing the areas for improvement from the last inspection. You have identified the areas of weakness and are taking effective action. Your determination to provide the best possible education for each pupil permeates your drive for improvement. You are well supported in this by staff and the governing body, who all share this passion. Together you have risen to challenges of changing national requirements, particularly the more rigorous curriculum. Teaching is increasingly effective. You have established a welcoming school environment that is a good place for pupils to be happy and learn. Pupils feel cared for and enjoy the range of facilities, school clubs and experiences they are offered. There is a sense of trust and mutual respect between pupils and adults and relationships are strong. One pupil summed up the views of those I spoke with: ‘There is always someone here to help.’ Tolerance to differences between individuals is evident; for example, pupils value the provision of the ‘LGBT club’. At the last inspection, inspectors noted the school’s many strengths in teaching, pupils’ achievement and behaviour. Three areas were identified for specific attention. The first was related to securing consistently strong progress in mathematics; the second was focused on improving pupils’ speaking and writing in all subjects. The final one was to ensure suitably challenging work in lessons for pupils of differing abilities, particularly the most able. Now: progress for pupils in mathematics has improved notably; achievement is increasingly sound, particularly in key stage 3 teachers are effectively planning and delivering lessons that challenge pupils in their learning, so as to meet their differing needs and abilities, including those of the most able pupils make strong progress in English, and the use of reading programmes has improved pupils’ confidence and performance in speaking and writing. Your drive to improve attendance last year was not as successful as you had hoped. In response, you have taken further effective action. Consequently, attendance is improving. You acknowledge that you still have some way to go to meet your high expectations. Study programmes in the sixth form were not fully meeting requirements last year, most notably in the provision of work experience. This is now in place. However, as the programme is new, its effectiveness is still to be fully evaluated. You have also tackled weaknesses in science teaching. Current work, drawing on external expertise from Leigh Academies Trust, is helping drive further improvement. You recognise that teaching in humanities has not improved to the same extent as other subjects. Safeguarding is effective. Leaders have in place a robust safeguarding system that makes sure all pupils are secure. Procedures and detailed policies (which have clearly stated review dates) are compliant with statutory requirements, and records are detailed and of high quality. Your designated safeguarding leader is well supported by five deputies. Recruitment procedures are thorough. Comprehensive and regular training of staff and governors, online and face-to-face, ensures that all are aware of their duties and responsibilities for pupils’ safety. All staff know the signs to look out for that may indicate a pupil is at risk of harm. It is evident that a culture of safeguarding runs throughout the school. Pupils say that they feel safe. They are aware how to stay safe when using the internet and social media. Instances of bullying are rare. Leaders make good use of support from external agencies. Inspection findings During the discussion with you and your vice principals at the start of the day, we agreed the key areas we would focus on during the inspection. These included: – the extent to which leaders have been successful in improving attendance and reducing levels of persistent absence for all groups of pupils – how effective leaders have been in raising standards of progress and attainment for all groups of pupils – the effectiveness of mathematics and science teaching – consideration of how successful leaders have been in improving behaviour – to what extent study programme requirements in the sixth form are met. Attendance has been a concern for the school, but data since September 2016 reveals an improving picture by all groups of students. Leaders and staff have worked hard in securing this improvement. Tracking and analysis of pupils’ attendance is now tighter. Effective use is made of counsellors, family workers and agencies to develop constructive links with parents. The recently introduced weekly attendance rewards system is helping to motivate pupils to attend regularly. Disadvantaged pupils, including the most able, typically make good progress because of improved teaching and support. Leaders use additional government funding increasingly resourcefully. Having recognised that previous spending was not making enough difference to disadvantaged pupils’ achievement, leaders wisely changed the approach. For example, the reading programme introduced in the last year has resulted in much-improved progress in reading for disadvantaged pupils with low reading ages on entry. You set high levels of expectation to improve the quality of teaching. You have established ‘Drive Teams’, groups of leaders and teachers concentrating on improving the quality of teaching and progress of different groups of pupils, such as the disadvantaged or the most able. In addition, effective training for staff, the appointment of good-quality staff and support from Leigh Academies Trust are also helping to ensure that teaching is preparing pupils well for the new GCSEs. Challenge within lessons across all key stages is evident, increasingly effectively meeting the differing abilities of pupils, including the most able. Teaching in English is an established strength of the school’s provision. Progress by the end of key stage 4 has improved notably in recent years, and in 2016 it was above the national average. Pupils’ achievement in mathematics and science is improving fast, particularly for key stage 3 pupils who achieve very well. However, due to previous weaknesses in teaching, outcomes in mathematics and science have been low and remain variable for current Year 11 pupils. You have addressed these weaknesses well, and are making sure these pupils are provided with as much support as possible to catch up. You recognise that current pupils’ achievement in history and geography is also too variable. Your success in improving teaching in other subjects makes you well placed to secure similar improvements in these subjects. You have introduced a behaviour management system that is understood by staff and pupils. It has brought improvement in pupils’ behaviour around the school and in lessons. Pupils commented that behaviour in the school has improved in recent years. Pupils typically settle to work quickly, work with focus and take pride in the presentation and care of their work. Low-level disruption is increasingly rare. Between lessons and at the end of break, pupils move with purpose; there are very few examples of tardiness. Pupils typically wear their uniform with pride. The number of fixed-term exclusions has decreased and is lower than the national average. Repeat exclusions are also low. You have achieved this through the introduction of an exit system, which sets clear levels of expectation, with associated consequences if pupils fail to meet them. In addition, your ‘Inclusion Zone’ provides a supportive environment for those pupils who may be at risk of exclusion. It has been successful in early re-integration of pupils to lessons. Study programmes in the sixth form now meet requirements. Previously, work experience was not a feature of life in the sixth form. Year 12 students are undertaking work experience this year. However, it is too early for leaders to determine the exact impact this will have on enhancing their studies, supporting their career decisions and in preparing them for life beyond school. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: absence, especially by disadvantaged pupils becomes increasingly rare the quality of teaching in history and geography in key stages 3 and 4 is developed so that pupils make consistently strong progress the recently introduced sixth form work experience programme is evaluated and developed so that it plays a key part in preparing students for life beyond school. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Medway. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely David Powell Ofsted Inspector Information about the inspection Inspectors met with you and the vice principals at the start of the day. We discussed your evaluation of the school’s effectiveness and agreed the key areas we would focus on during the inspection. Over the day, inspectors held further discussions with you and other senior leaders. I met with governors, and separately with the chief executive of Leigh Academies Trust, which Strood Academy joined on 1 January 2017. Inspectors, accompanied by you and senior leaders, visited 22 part lessons. In addition, a selection of pupils’ work from different key stages was scrutinised jointly with school leaders. Inspectors took account of responses to questionnaires completed by 62 members of staff, 15 responses by pupils and 48 responses by parents to Ofsted’s online questionnaire, Parent View. Inspectors also considered written comments completed by parents. One inspector spoke with pupils and staff at breaktime. She met with a group of pupils and students from Years 7 to 13 and separately with a group of staff. Inspectors analysed a wide range of the school’s documentation, including leaders’ checks on pupils’ progress, attendance and behaviour information, and safeguarding policies and procedures.

Strood Academy Parent Reviews



Average Parent Rating

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“*****”

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"> Great school, they really value your child's education and personal development on the whole and recognise when your child is working hard. They've really helped my child's confidence grow.
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Strongly Agree 19% Agree 43% Disagree 25% Strongly Disagree 13% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>19, "agree"=>43, "disagree"=>25, "strongly_disagree"=>13, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022
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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 75 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

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Figures based on 264 responses up to 03-01-2022

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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