St Paul's Catholic Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
110
AGES
2 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Voluntary aided school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
0151 606 2000

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(28/3/17)
Full Report - All Reports
55%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Farmfield Drive
Beechwood
Prenton
CH43 7TE
01516527828

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You, the staff and the governing body strive continually to provide a safe, nurturing and stimulating environment for your pupils, some of whom come from vulnerable families. You evaluate the work of the school effectively and use your conclusions to identify priorities for improvement and consequent action which you rigorously implement. The drop in achievement in 2016 of the pupils at the end of Years 2 and 6 is untypical. Published data does not reflect fully the true quality of the school’s work. As cohort numbers are very small and pupil mobility is very high, outcomes for pupils at the end of Year 6 can vary widely. For example, pupils’ progress over their time at key stage 2 was above average at the end of 2015, but below average at the end of 2016. You have tackled well the areas for improvement identified at the last inspection. Teaching is now consistent and your new marking policy ensures that pupils in all classes know how well they have done and how to improve their work. The parents I spoke to expressed very positive views about the school. They find staff approachable and appreciate the way in which you greet pupils every morning at the gate. This means that parents can immediately air any concerns. This was summed up for me by one parent, who wrote, ‘The school is very proactive when dealing with parents’ concerns.’ Teaching is good across the school. Parents told me how well teachers provide for pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities. This is borne out by the good progress that these pupils make. Pupils supported by pupil premium funding generally make the same progress as other pupils from their starting points. Pupils demonstrate good attitudes to learning. Their social and academic progress is fostered well. Your pupils learn how to take on responsibility, such as serving on the school or Eco councils, and told me that they felt they understood British values well. Your ‘bully buster’ campaign is effective. The pupils I met were confident that bullying was not a problem in school and that if it occurred then it was dealt with well by the staff. As a result, your pupils feel safe and well looked after. I was especially impressed by the new provision that you created for two-year-old children from September 2014. These children work with adults in their own separate room and have their own outdoor garden and learning area. The garden area is very attractive, with ‘smelly wellies’ (the smell is from the herb rosemary) and apple trees, and on the day of my visit children were planting tomatoes. You provide a very secure environment which has been resourced with small children in mind. All the welfare requirements are met effectively and your scrapbook of activities illustrates well how quickly the children have settled and how soon they make progress. Learning activities, such as teddy bears’ picnics, celebrating world book day, learning nursery rhymes (including parents), exploring ice in winter and baking gingerbread men, have resulted in all of the children in the setting making better than expected progress towards the early learning goals. A particularly effective activity was that in which children picked the apples from their own garden, made apple crumble and enjoyed it as part of their lunch. They also regularly bake banana bread for homeless people in the area. Expert questioning by adults accelerates their learning very effectively. For example, children could say how many apples they used and what the ingredients were. Safeguarding is effective. You, your staff and governors share a commitment to keeping pupils safe. Your arrangements for safeguarding are meticulous and highly effective. You work successfully with other agencies to minimise the possibility of harm to any pupil. Staff told me that they receive regular and high-quality safeguarding training to keep them well informed and up to date. They felt that they knew how to act in a range of different circumstances. The staff told me that they do not consider what may appear to be small concerns to be unimportant and so are always prepared to raise a concern quickly. You carefully evaluate the risks involved when pupils take part in different activities. You are assiduous in ensuring that staff recruitment is conducted safely. Pupils were confident in saying that they are well looked after and can share any worries they might have with an adult. They described their school as a happy and safe place. They like the pastoral care group sessions in which pupils from all classes work together in groups to earn ‘golden tickets’. You have set up key worker groups so that all pupils have a safe ‘listening adult’ who can provide emotional and academic support when necessary. Pupils told me confidently that they understood how to keep themselves safe in different situations. I was impressed by their awareness of the dangers to avoid when using the internet and social media. Leaders and governors ensure that safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose and that records are detailed and of good quality. Weekly safeguarding meetings ensure that staff are constantly vigilant and alert to any concerns. You were able to show me the records of pupils who had benefited substantially from support provided by the school in different circumstances. Inspection findings You have identified that boys are achieving less well than girls in some classes and have promptly adopted new strategies to help boys to make stronger progress. These include making sure that there are plenty of opportunities for pupils to investigate topics using modern technology and ensuring that boys are given research topics that appeal to them. Boys and girls alike enjoy using the hand-held ‘Paul pods’ to instantly record their answers. Younger boys especially enjoy the mathematics challenge of the day which often takes place outdoors. Currently, you are using the building site next door to the school as a learning experience. Some houses are being erected and teachers are using this as a source of interesting mathematical problem-solving questions. In the early years and key stage 1 classes you ensure that there are plenty of building and water experiments and there is a good focus on investigation in science topics. Your staff are choosing reading texts which especially appeal to boys. It is pleasing that currently 50% of the pupils who enjoy coming to ‘Tales at Teatime’ in the library are boys. The success of your strategies is reflected in the fact that this year all the middle-ability boys in key stage 2 are on track to achieve the standards expected for their ages. You are working hard to build on the good progress your younger children make in phonics so that they become fluent and competent readers. This is not always reflected in published data because the children who have achieved well in phonics at the end of Year 1 sometimes leave and those who come in Year 2 have not always had the benefit of the same good grounding. The younger pupils who read to me were well taught to use decoding skills to pronounce new and difficult words. Older pupils explained to me that they knew how important it is to learn to read well but that it is also a great pleasure. Your newly refurbished library is a most attractive space, with many enticing books and quiet reading corners as well as lovely murals and twinkling fairy lights. A good number of pupils enjoy hearing adults read there after school in ‘Tales at Teatime’ sessions. You and your staff recognise that standards in mathematics are not as good as they could be, and particularly for middle-ability pupils. Your staff have worked with consultants to improve their awareness of the rigours of the new mathematics curriculum. You are part of a local cluster of schools that share good practice and moderate each other’s work to make sure that assessments are accurate.

St Paul's Catholic Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 82% Agree 18% Disagree 0% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>82, "agree"=>18, "disagree"=>0, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022
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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 10 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

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Figures based on 11 responses up to 06-04-2022

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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