St Michael and St Martin Catholic Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
472
AGES
3 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Voluntary aided school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
020 8583 2721

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(18/6/19)
Full Report - All Reports
92%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Belgrave Road
Hounslow
TW4 7AG
02085729658

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. Based on evidence gathered during this short inspection, I am of the opinion that the school has demonstrated strong practice and marked improvement in specific areas. This may indicate that the school has improved significantly overall. Therefore, I am recommending that the school’s next inspection be a section 5 inspection. You have very high expectations of pupils and adults at the school. This is reflected in the school’s ethos, which is firmly based on Christian values. All members of the school community recognise the dignity of every person and strive for excellence in all aspects of education. Recent academic outcomes have been very strong across key stages 1 and 2. Regular pupil progress meetings underpin your relentless pursuit for school improvement. Leaders use these meetings to identify academic and pastoral support for individual pupils. For example, you quickly capture concerns about pupils’ progress and attainment and cross-reference this information with their attendance. Leaders, including governors, are aware of the need to ensure strong progress for pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND). As a result, you have committed significant resources to support these pupils. For example, all pupils meet their support and therapy targets, and review meetings reflect this. Pupils make strong progress and enjoy their learning. Year 6 pupils demonstrated this when they were observed completing a yearbook based on their experiences at the school. The activity captured their imagination, and pupils responded well to the challenge. Pupils’ information and technology skills enable them to access their learning, because they have a strong understanding of how to produce computerbased presentations. Leaders continually seek to improve the curriculum offer. Recently, they reviewed the science curriculum. They found that books showed too much reliance on theoretical lessons and that pupils needed to complete more practical experiments. They discovered that teachers were not routinely confident in teaching science. As a result, leaders introduced new initiatives. Teachers now access online training to improve their science subject knowledge, and leaders check teachers’ planning to validate the science content. Weekly plans include assessment opportunities. This helps teachers and leaders to understand whether pupils have met weekly targets. Leaders listen to pupils’ views. For example, ideas for cross-curricular activities in science came from pupils. In year 2, they created clay hedgehogs, wrote poems on science topics and researched the life and work of David Attenborough. Safeguarding is effective. The leadership team has ensured that all safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose. Leaders take their safeguarding responsibilities very seriously. When issues arise, they are quick to protect and support their pupils. They share a mantra of ‘if in doubt shout’, so that safeguarding concerns are addressed quickly. New staff benefit from a comprehensive induction programme, which includes safeguarding. They understand what to look out for and how to report concerns. Leaders anticipate how pupils may react to changes in their circumstances and put support in place before the need arises. Leaders are quick to escalate the seriousness of online safety. For example, a recent issue led to leaders using external experts to highlight dangers associated with pupils using the internet. Pupils told me that they know how to keep safe online because they have been given information and advice in lessons and during the esafety week. They told me that, if they have any concerns about what they see, they would tell a responsible adult, leave the website and not access it again. Inspection findings At the beginning of the inspection we agreed two lines of enquiry. The first was to explore outcomes for pupils who speak English as an additional language (EAL). This was because this group of pupils makes up a significant proportion of the school roll. Leaders appreciate that, for many pupils, the school is key in teaching them to read and write and are determined to strengthen all pupils’ literacy skills. Leaders draw on the experience of staff at the school to achieve this. Practitioners who are skilled in supporting EAL pupils deliver training to increase the skills of all staff. Teachers understand how EAL pupils develop their communication skills and ensure that the curriculum promotes this. Overall, this group of pupils makes strong progress. Leaders recognise that, for EAL pupils, early support and intervention in reading and writing in English have the greatest long-term impact on their progress. Therefore, leaders begin to identify the needs of individual children before they start at the school. Leaders communicate well with new parents, and an extensive induction programme is in place. Leaders use home visits to learn about children’s abilities and to involve parents and carers in the education of their children from the start. Leaders have high expectations for all pupils, including those who speak English as an additional language. These expectations are highlighted in the way leaders compare different groups of pupils’ performances and prioritise the quality of teaching in the classroom. Leaders’ emphasis on vocabulary extends across all subjects. For example, when introducing themed topics, teachers review pupils’ technical vocabulary. Once topics are completed, pupils consolidate their understanding of newly learned vocabulary by writing out definitions. Pupils react well to teachers’ written feedback. Their spelling and vocabulary improve, because teachers draw their pupils’ attention to new words and phrases. For example, when discussing misspelled words, pupils learn how to spell the words correctly and define their meaning. Leaders compare EAL pupils with other groups of pupils. Historically, these pupils have made progress at least in line with their peers. Evidence from the inspection shows that EAL pupils continue to make at least the same progress as their peers. Leaders’ information on pupils’ progress is robust and accurate. They know their pupils well. For example, leaders implemented a recent intervention following a school holiday. This is because they know that some pupils lose ground over the holidays. Outcomes at the end of key stages 1 and 2 for EAL pupils and their peers are strong and well above those of their peers nationally. The second line of enquiry was to explore the effectiveness of the governing body. This was agreed because there are vacant positions on the governing body. Governors are reflective. A recent audit highlighted some gaps in governors’ skills that may affect their ability to support and challenge school leaders. Leaders, including governors, have, as a result, commissioned external experts to support their work. Governors have not successfully filled vacant positions. This is a work in progress.

St Michael and St Martin Catholic Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 66% Agree 33% Disagree 0% Strongly Disagree 2% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>66, "agree"=>33, "disagree"=>0, "strongly_disagree"=>2, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019
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Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

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Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

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Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 58 responses up to 20-06-2019

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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