Sir Harry Smith Community College
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Secondary
Post 16
PUPILS
1089
AGES
11 - 18
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Academy converter
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
unlock
UNLOCK

Can I Get My Child Into This School?

Enter a postcode to see where you live on the map
heatmap example
Sample Map Only
Very Likely
Likely
Less Likely

This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
0345 045 1370

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(10/10/18)
Full Report - All Reports
54%
NATIONAL AVG. 60%
5+ GCSEs grade 9-4 (standard pass or above) including English and maths



Unlock the rest of the data now
  • See All Official School Data
  • View Catchment Area Maps
  • Access 2022 League Tables
  • Read Real Parent Reviews
  • Unlock 2022 Star Ratings
  • Easily Choose Your #1 School
£14.95
Per month


Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 12% of schools in England) Below Average (About 20% of schools in England) Average (About 37% of schools in England) Above Average (About 17% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 14% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 5% of schools in England) Below Average (About 25% of schools in England) Average (About 48% of schools in England) Above Average (About 17% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 5% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% of pupils who achieved 5+ GCSEs grade 9-4
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% of pupils who achieved GCSE grade 5 or above in both English and maths
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% of pupils who achieved 3 A levels at AAB or higher

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Eastrea Road
Whittlesey
Peterborough
PE7 1XB
01733703991

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. Sir Harry Smith Community College is a vibrant, welcoming and caring school, in which pupils enjoy their learning and feel valued. Pupils benefit from learning within a calm and productive classroom environment; they get to work quickly and maintain their focus, including when the work they are completing is challenging. Relationships are highly positive, which gives pupils the confidence to share their ideas or to ask for help if they are unsure of something. Outside of the classroom, many pupils participate in the exceptionally rich range of cultural, musical and sporting activities that the school has to offer. Pupils often develop their interests to a high level, engaging in debating contests at the University of Cambridge, for example, or taking part in the ‘Awesome Shakespeare’ drama group. Many parents commented on, as one put it, the resulting ‘development of pupils’ life skills and the creation of positive and long-lasting memories’. Staff ensure that pupils behave very well, both in the classroom and around the school. A high proportion of parents and carers who responded to Ofsted’s online questionnaire, Parent View, agree that the school ensures that pupils are well behaved. Many parents also commented about the support and encouragement their children receive; one parent noted: ‘In the past year I have seen my daughter grow in confidence and take pride in her work. The school has developed her motivation and belief in herself. Now she works really hard to achieve.’ Pupils who spoke with us made clear that, typically, teachers ‘go the extra mile’ to help them. This was consistent with other inspection evidence. As a result, most pupils make good progress and achieve public examination results that are at least in line with pupils with the same starting points nationally. Pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities, who attend the school’s enhanced provision centre, typically make good progress because they are well supported. Together with other leaders, including governors, you are rigorous in checking the quality of the school’s work and determined in your pursuit of improvement. You identified that sometimes pupils did not make rapid enough progress in Year 7 because the work they completed lacked sufficient challenge. In response, you have enabled teachers to work closely with their colleagues in the local primary schools. This has helped them to plan activities that build on what pupils already know and can do by the time they finish key stage 2. These developments have enabled pupils to make a strong start to their secondary education. You have continued to improve provision in the school’s large and growing sixth form. Leaders and teachers are encouraging a sense of high ambition and aspiration among the students who attend it. In 2017, students’ progress was strong in both their academic and vocational qualifications. The proportion of students who gained places at the country’s most selective universities was above the national average. You work well to ensure that pupils are aware of the range of post-18 opportunities that are available, well before they join the sixth form. You help them to develop the confidence they need to aim high. Students benefit from access to mock interviews, visits to universities, and the chance to talk with former students who have been successful in higher education. Governors share your commitment to provide the best education and fullest range of opportunities for pupils. Governors provide you with strong support and ask welltargeted questions. These, together with regular visits, develop governors’ understanding of standards at the school, and hold leaders to account well. Their challenge helps to secure improvement. Safeguarding is effective. The leadership team has ensured that safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose. Staff, pupils and parents are rightly confident that pupils are well looked after at school. Leaders, including governors, have helped to create and sustain a culture in which pupils’ safety is everyone’s responsibility. Staff benefit from regular training about safeguarding-related issues, which helps them to maintain a good understanding of the risks that pupils face and how they should act if they have concerns about an individual’s welfare. Staff take notice of changes in behaviour, appearance or patterns of attendance that might indicate a pupil to be vulnerable. Staff report any concerns promptly. You take prompt and appropriate action to promote pupils’ safety, and work well with external agencies to secure their support when that is needed. Pupils told us that they feel safe at school and enjoy their learning. They believe that staff typically deal with bullying effectively, and the school’s monitoring records indicate that repeat incidents of bullying are rare. Inspection findings Our first line of enquiry involved establishing the extent to which the most able make the progress that they should by the end of key stage 4. This was an area for improvement identified by the previous inspection report. You have focused upon increasing the opportunities that the most able have for personal development, through engaging them in activities outside of the classroom. The breadth of these is considerable. For example, pupils made clear that they particularly benefited from the events organised by The Brilliant Club, a nonprofit organisation that seeks to widen access to university for students from under-represented groups. You have also worked to increase the extent to which the most able complete learning activities that develop their thinking and deepen their knowledge and understanding. You are setting high expectations in this respect. You are rightly checking how successfully teachers plan and implement sequences of learning that get the best out of the most able pupils. You are holding subject leaders to account effectively for standards in this regard. Many teachers ask the most able pupils questions that encourage them to think hard. Some teachers provide these pupils with more complex texts to read, and teach them how to research a topic carefully, using different sources of information. This helps to prepare key stage 4 pupils well for post-16 study. At GCSE, teachers typically provide very precise guidance to the most able pupils that helps them understand how best to apply what they know to the more demanding examination questions. The most able pupils typically complete suitably difficult work; this is particularly the case during key stage 4 and in English, history and mathematics. Pupils make good progress in these subjects, and in drama, physical education, sociology and psychology. Overall, by the end of key stage 4, the proportion of top grades awarded at GCSE is in line with the national average. The most able pupils typically make very good progress in the sixth form and achieve highly. Over time, teaching, learning and assessment have been less effective at meeting these pupils’ needs within chemistry, geography and modern foreign languages, owing in part to staffing instability within these subjects. You acknowledge that overall, provision for the most able in history and geography is less effective at key stage 3 than it is at key stage 4. We also agreed to establish how far leaders have ensured that less-able pupils make good progress within mathematics and science. In 2017, these pupils made too little progress in these subjects by the end of key stage 4. Unvalidated data indicates that the less able made better progress by the end of key stage 4 in 2018 in both subjects. This reflects additional help provided to pupils that supported them to diminish some of the differences in their knowledge and understanding. It also reflects improvements to teaching within mathematics. You acknowledge that there is still more to do to ensure that teaching is strong enough to prevent the less able from falling behind in the first place. Plans have been put in place that are beginning to address this. Leaders’ improvement planning in science is not sharply focused enough upon the needs of the less able. As a result, some of these pupils do not do as well as they might. Too often, teachers do not check these pupils’ knowledge and understanding carefully enough. This results in pupils’ misconceptions not being identified or corrected. Teachers do not ensure that pupils’ vocabulary is sufficiently well-developed in specific subjects. This prevents some pupils from applying their knowledge well and writing scientifically. Our final line of enquiry involved establishing how far pupils are making the progress that they should in humanities subjects. In 2016 and 2017, pupils made insufficient progress, particularly in geography and history, by the end of key stage 4. In 2018, pupils’ progress and outcomes in both subjects improved. Subject leaders have ensured that pupils practise key skills more regularly so that these are better developed by the end of key stage 4. In history, this is helping pupils to evaluate better the utility and reliability of different sources of evidence, for example. You acknowledge that these improvements are most evident at key stage 4. In key stage 3, the extent to which activities and resources challenge the most able and support the less able remains too variable, particularly in geography. Although leaders are making the necessary changes to ensure that pupils make the same rapid progress as at key stage 4, it is too soon for the impact of this work to be fully evident. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: the most able pupils make the progress they should in chemistry, geography and modern foreign languages the less able gain secure knowledge and understanding in science, and develop their literacy skills effectively in different subjects all groups of pupils make good progress in the humanities at key stage 3. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body and the chief executive of the multi-academy trust, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Cambridgeshire. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website.

Sir Harry Smith Community College Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 55% Agree 36% Disagree 7% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>55, "agree"=>36, "disagree"=>7, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019
unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

unlock

Figures based on 74 responses up to 17-06-2019

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

Your rating:
Review guidelines
  • Do explain who you are and your relationship to the school e.g. ‘I am a parent…’
  • Do back up your opinion with examples or clear reasons but, remember, it’s your opinion not fact.
  • Don’t use bad or aggressive language.
  • Don't go in to detail about specific staff or pupils. Individual complaints should be directed to the school.
  • Do go to the relevant authority is you have concerns about a serious issue such as bullying, drug abuse or bad management.
Read the full review guidelines and where to find help if you have serious concerns about a school.
We respect your privacy and never share your email address with the reviewed school or any third parties. Please see our T&Cs and Privacy Policy for details of how we treat registered emails with TLC.


News, Photos and Open Days from Sir Harry Smith Community College

We are waiting for this school to upload information. Represent this school?
Register your details to add open days, photos and news.

Do you represent
Sir Harry Smith Community College?

Register to add photos, news and download your Certificate of Excellence 2021/22

*Official school administrator email addresses

(eg [email protected]). Details will be verified.

Questions? Email [email protected]

We're here to help your school to add information for parents.

Thank you for registering your details

A member of the School Guide team will verify your details within 2 working days and provide further detailed instructions for setting up your School Noticeboard.

For any questions please email [email protected]