Roding Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
451
AGES
3 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Community school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
020 8554 5000

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(5/3/19)
Full Report - All Reports
59%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Roding Lane North
Woodford Bridge
Woodford Green
IG8 8NP
02085043706

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You promote the ethos of the school, that pupils are free to achieve, through all of your work. This is reflected in the inclusive nature of your provision for deaf pupils, which currently has 40 pupils. Leaders intend for all pupils, whatever their needs, to be educated alongside their peers. For example, those pupils who attend the provision receive bespoke programmes of learning which include lessons with their hearing peers. You have recognised the need to improve pupils’ outcomes in reading and therefore placed appropriate resources in place. For example, leaders understand how important the school’s library is in encouraging pupils to read. Leaders have made the decision to move the library into the foyer area of the school, so that pupils can more easily access the rich texts on offer. The areas for improvement identified at the previous inspection have been addressed. Pupils know what they need to do to improve their classwork. For example, in a writing lesson, pupils quoted from feedback and described how they would improve their writing during lesson activities. In books, pupils responded to teachers’ comments and these conversations enabled deeper learning to take place. Leaders ensure, through regular training, that skilled adults support pupils. Pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) told me that they value the direct adult help that they receive and how, consequently, their reading has improved. Pupils with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) understand the expectations of adults and follow routines and systems that address their academic needs but also keep them safe. Safeguarding is effective. The leadership team has ensured that all safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose. Senior leaders and governors regularly check the suitability of safeguarding arrangements so that the highest standards of safeguarding are upheld. Staff responsible for the management of safeguarding records receive regular and relevant training. Recruitment checks are thorough and ensure the suitability of staff to work with pupils at the school. Pupils told me that they feel safe at school and that they are kept safe by their teachers and the school’s leaders. Through assemblies and lessons, they are well informed on how to stay safe online. They told me how they have a number of ways to report issues when using the internet. They also told me that the ‘worry box’ system works well and that their concerns are listened to. Inspection findings At our initial meeting, we agreed on three lines of enquiry. The first was based on pupils’ progress in reading. This was chosen because historically, pupils’ progress in reading, compared with the national standard, was below that in other core subjects at the school. The school development plan highlights reading as an area of focus. These plans are thorough and have been drawn up following careful consideration. Resources have been assigned to support reading and clear timelines are imposed for improvement. Leaders direct interventions that support the individual. Leaders are aware of the progress of groups of pupils. For example, they have identified boys’ underachievement in reading. Hence, middle leaders have targeted boys and introduced texts that ignite their imagination. A recent visit to the school by a poet rekindled boys’ enthusiasm for reading, and parents commented on their children’s increased interest in reading. A number of teachers have been trained in assessing pupils’ reading. They use these skills to improve assessment practice across the school. They share their knowledge so that accurate judgements on pupils’ progress are made. Reading records show an accurate picture of pupils’ progress in reading. Readers read texts that encourage them to improve their vocabulary. The way leaders highlight reading is evident across the school. For example, classrooms have reading corners where children’s and pupils’ reading is celebrated. Pupils benefited from the introduction of a reflective reading programme and they remarked on how, consequently, their reading has improved. Teachers share their favourite books and authors with pupils and use this as a learning tool. Leaders have high expectations for improvements in pupils’ ability to use their phonics knowledge. The least able readers, including pupils who speak English as an additional language, receive extra support with their phonics. Leaders ensure that these booster groups are well resourced. Interventions to improve reading are having a positive impact and leaders have recently extended that support. Young readers are encouraged to read through play. In Reception classrooms, children reacted well to words being written on leaves and were able to use these words in simple sentences. The second line of enquiry was based on disadvantaged pupils’ progress in mathematics. This was chosen because recently, disadvantaged pupils in key stage 2 had underperformed in mathematics compared with their peers nationally. Leaders have identified disadvantaged pupils as underachieving compared with their non-disadvantaged peers locally and nationally. Leaders frequently conduct classroom observations and learning walks which focus on disadvantaged pupils. Leaders use this scrutiny to direct middle leaders’ and teachers’ support. In mathematics classrooms, disadvantaged pupils were working at an appropriate level for their age and responded well to teachers’ feedback. When disadvantaged pupils need more concentrated support, this is provided. For example, during an observation, a number of pupils were helped with their first steps in understanding algebra. Leaders have targeted the disadvantaged mathematics learners and their families and delivered workshops to help parents work with their children at home. Currently, progress in mathematics for those pupils in Year 6 in receipt of the pupil premium is broadly in line with that of their peers. The third line of enquiry was based on pupils’ attendance. This was chosen because, recently, attendance rates have been below national figures. Leaders, including governors, understand the importance of pupils’ regular attendance and the particular issues for the school. Leaders are aware that the medical needs of some groups of the school population affect attendance. Leaders balance the medical needs of pupils at the school with the needs of the school curriculum. Rewards and sanctions are used appropriately to promote attendance. Pupils have responded well to the latest reward systems, and whole classes now aspire to 100% attendance. However, recent attendance rates are still not in line with national levels. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: there is consistently strong development of phonics, including for the least able pupils attendance remains a school priority and that rates of absence reduce through sustained parental engagement. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Redbridge. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Jason Hughes Ofsted Inspector Information about the inspection I held meetings with school leaders, staff and pupils. I spoke with a governor on the telephone. Leaders accompanied me on visits to lessons, where we observed teaching and learning, spoke with pupils and looked at their work. I examined a range of documentation relating to safeguarding, including the single central record. I scrutinised Ofsted’s online survey for parents (44 responses) and associated commentary (38 comments), the staff survey (45 responses) and pupil survey (61 responses). I examined the school’s website and reviewed information about pupils’ progress, attainment and attendance. I also considered the school’s evaluation of how well it is doing, its improvement priorities and assessment information for current pupils. I also met with the school’s improvement partner.

Roding Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 61% Agree 26% Disagree 6% Strongly Disagree 6% Don't Know 2% {"strongly_agree"=>61, "agree"=>26, "disagree"=>6, "strongly_disagree"=>6, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019
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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

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Figures based on 54 responses up to 05-03-2019

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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