Montem Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
338
AGES
2 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Community school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
020 7527 5515.

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(13/6/17)
Full Report - All Reports
45%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Hornsey Road
Islington
N7 7QT
02072726556

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You have successfully worked with governors to strengthen the school leadership team so that actions are successfully carried out to support the school’s improvement priorities. Your senior and middle leaders work well together with you and take joint responsibility for bringing about improvement. Leaders’ enthusiasm follows through into carefully thought-out plans and actions that you collectively consider will make a difference. These follow through into work with teachers and careful checking to make sure that the actions are successful, and that pupils are benefiting. Governors support plans to improve achievement and they challenge you and leaders to make sure that the actions are the most appropriate ones to take. However, whereas pupil achievement in national assessments has risen in some areas in recent years, falls in other areas have not always been predicted early enough. Governors refer to this ‘jack-in-the-box’ effect. Leaders and governors are working together to tighten the evaluation of how well the school is doing. However, once a priority for improvement is identified, it is tackled well. There are advanced plans for the school to formalise a federation with another local school. These have been very carefully considered and well communicated within the community. Senior and middle leaders provide a good team to maintain the drive for further improvement through any organisational change. The school is an orderly community where pupils behave well and look after each other. Teachers build pupils’ confidence through praise and encouragement and this ensures a good atmosphere for learning, with pupils feeling positive and keen to do well. From very low starting points when the youngest pupils join the school, teachers plan a good range of activities that enrich language and provide shared experiences for pupils to talk with confidence, and to broaden their vocabulary. Teachers plan work at the right level for different pupils in their class and ensure that pupils know how to find the support they need if they are uncertain. This encourages pupils to think, to work together and to apply their skills and knowledge. It has contributed to a community where pupils both value and respect each other, and take pride in each other’s achievements. Parents, staff and governors have confidence in both you and in the school. Safeguarding is effective. Safeguarding arrangements are thorough, with rigorous vetting of new staff and extra checks implemented for those employed from outside the UK. Governors regularly monitor the school’s detailed records and procedures. All staff have had appropriate and recent training and maintain a good awareness of safeguarding through weekly reminders, quizzes and updates at staff meetings. Senior leaders manage referrals well. They work together effectively to manage caseloads, coordinate information, and to chase up external agencies when responses to referrals are slow. Between them, leaders keep a close watch over pupils when there is a concern and maintain regular contact with external agencies to coordinate their support. You have carefully considered the risks of sharing the building and outdoor space with another school and have good arrangements in place to avoid visitors to the partner school coming into contact with your pupils. Pupils know how to keep themselves safe and to minimise risks. They have a good awareness of e-safety when using computers and know how to react and report if they experience cyber bullying. Older pupils confidently rehearse a simple but effective phrase to remind themselves of the procedure to follow if they feel threatened or bullied online. Behaviour is good and pupils play safely. They respect the diversity of their community and look out for each other. They do not tolerate name-calling based on faith or difference. They know whom to tell if they are concerned about a friend or by the way in which other pupils approach or talk to them. They are confident that their concerns would be taken seriously. All this contributes to an effective culture of safeguarding where pupils are safe and staff are vigilant. Inspection findings My first focus for the inspection was to review how leaders are ensuring that pupils read confidently with greater breadth and depth to support good progress and high achievement. In 2016 reading assessments, although pupils in Years 1 and 2 had good knowledge of phonics (letters and the sounds they represent), progress in reading was significantly below average by the end of Year 6. Improving reading is a high priority for the school, and both governors and leaders have come together to bring about the change needed. Leaders have worked with other schools and the local authority to introduce a creative plan to accelerate progress in reading. Governors have committed money to help match that provided by the local authority to implement the plan and they carefully check the progress that pupils make. This is working well, with leaders supporting alongside teachers and providing training on teaching reading comprehension. Regular checks on pupils’ progress show that rapid improvement is happening. Many older pupils are now reading confidently and with greater depth and understanding. Although you have introduced e-readers to motivate and encourage pupils to read at home, outside reading lessons, older pupils are not yet avid and regular readers. They lack confidence in how to use the library coding system to find information they need, and some have a limited interest in reading for pleasure. ‘Reading champions’ have recently been appointed to promote reading across classes but these have yet to establish a culture where pupils actively read for pleasure and enjoyment. Another focus was to understand how governors and leaders ensure that disadvantaged pupils, particularly middle attainers, receive the support needed to achieve as well as other pupils in literacy and mathematics. In 2016, progress made by this group of pupils in Year 2 assessments was lower in mathematics than in reading and writing. It was significantly below average for disadvantaged middle-attaining pupils in at least one subject by the end of Year 6. Leaders have implemented a broad range of well-targeted interventions for those disadvantaged pupils who need additional help and support in mathematics and in writing. The leader responsible for pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities guides and supports teachers in planning work to ensure that they make good progress in lessons. Learning mentor support gives extra help to disadvantaged pupils who have not made sufficient progress in the past. Consequently, they are catching up and their achievement is not significantly different to that of other groups of pupils. However, while you have implemented a broad range of projects and actions, the impact of individual initiatives has not been rigorously evaluated to understand which are having the greatest impact and which duplicate effort. You therefore do not have the information needed to help make future decisions on how best to use the funding you have. An additional focus for the inspection was to look at how middle leaders ensure that high-quality teaching is consistent across the curriculum and all classes. The previous inspection reported some inconsistencies in the quality of teaching and there have been some significant changes in staffing since that time. Teaching was good at the time of the last inspection and this is still the case. Middle leaders have successfully introduced an effective system of working in teams to share ideas and for teachers to learn from each other. This is working well and provides valuable opportunities to model good teaching and to make sure that pupils are consistently challenged. Across the school, leaders use assessment well to discuss the achievement of individual pupils with their teachers and to work together to plan teaching which ensures that all pupils make good progress and that gaps in achievement between different groups of pupils are narrowed. This is working well to ensure consistency in the quality of teaching and to ensure that new teachers who join the school are fully supported.

Montem Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 43% Agree 43% Disagree 14% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>43, "agree"=>43, "disagree"=>14, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018
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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

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Figures based on 14 responses up to 18-10-2018

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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