Millbrook Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
406
AGES
2 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Community school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(10/5/18)
Full Report - All Reports
66%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Grainger Drive
Leegomery
Telford
TF1 6UJ
01952387640

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the previous inspection. You have acted upon the areas identified for improvement, and with positive results. For instance, the quality of mathematics teaching has improved, and pupils regularly apply their mathematical knowledge in different subjects. Subject leadership has strengthened and you are successful at identifying and nurturing staff talent, so that teachers’ skills are developed and put to good use. The current senior leadership team, which has grown under your leadership, is capable, energetic, objective and ambitious. This effective leadership ensures that teaching continues to develop and improve. Your, the governors’ and other leaders’ evaluations of the school’s current performance are well informed and honest. You all acknowledge that, while progress rates are in line with national figures, attainment in reading needs to rise. This is a key feature of your current school development plan, and your team is working hard to make this happen. Pupils say they enjoy school, especially mathematics, and many take on responsibilities that help the school to run smoothly and safely. Parents and carers who spoke with me and those that responded to Ofsted’s online questionnaire, Parent View, also had positive things to say about the school’s work. They particularly appreciate the visibility and approachability of staff, the support for pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities and the attention given to pupils’ welfare and safety. Nevertheless, despite these positive views, some families allow their children to miss too much school without good reason. The school and its grounds are well kept and many school displays celebrate highquality work and promote worthwhile messages about respect, safety and treating others fairly. There is a sense of optimistic purpose about the school, which is evident in the calm excitement generated in lessons, pupils’ orderly conduct and the friendly, relaxed, yet focused, manner of staff and pupils. This is a supportive and effective school that has expanded significantly since the previous inspection. It is led well. Safeguarding is effective. The school’s procedures for keeping pupils safe are excellent. Every routine and course of action has been well thought through and informed by up-to-date training. The five safeguarding leads make sure that everyone who works in or visits the school knows what to do should a concern about a child’s welfare or safety arise. They check on adults’ knowledge through regular questionnaires and staff meetings. Around the school building there are numerous signs that remind pupils and adults how to stay safe and what to do if they are worried about anything. The school’s records show that when staff have needed to report a concern, they have done so promptly and put children’s safety first. In addition to the work done by adults, pupils also take a lead in safeguarding matters. There is a pupil-led safety squad, made up of two pupils from each year group. These pupils wear bright green sweatshirts so they are easy to spot and pupils can go to them if they are upset, worried or scared. The safety squad helps to sort out minor problems and knows how to report more significant concerns. Governors, too, take their safeguarding duties very seriously and are properly informed and on the ball. On the playground, supervision arrangements work well and first aid treatment is given quickly when required. Other health and safety matters, such as risk assessments for school trips, site security and storage arrangements for medicines, operate with attentive efficiency. Inspection findings Most children start school with a level of knowledge and skill below that typical for their age. In many cases, children’s language and communication skills are limited. In response, the early years provision focuses heavily on developing children’s learning behaviours, social skills and language, and with notable success. In addition, the school has started admitting children from the age of two, which is clearly making a positive difference. By the time children reach the end of their Reception Year, the proportion reaching a good level of development is now above the national average and most children are well prepared for learning in Year 1. Key stage 1 makes the most of this strong start. Year after year, scores in the 2 Year 1 phonics screening check have been above national averages. The proportions of pupils reaching the expected standard for their age in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of Year 2 were above national averages in both 2016 and 2017. In key stage 2, the picture of progress and attainment is more mixed. Overall, progress rates in reading, writing and mathematics have been broadly average in recent years. In 2016, however, mathematics was particularly strong, and in 2016 and 2017, mathematics and writing both presented a stronger picture of attainment than was seen in reading. In both years, reading attainment at the end of Year 6 was below average. Leaders and staff are alert to this and have taken steps to identify the reasons and lift standards higher. Leaders’ analysis of pupils’ classwork and their performance in tests has led them to change the way reading is taught. There is a now a greater focus on fluency, the development of vocabulary and reading for meaning. In all classes, pupils regularly read aloud to one another and then discuss what they have read and what it means. Wall displays in classrooms, such as ‘great thinkers use great words’, prompt pupils to extend their vocabulary and understanding of the concepts that sit behind words. Teachers and teaching assistants routinely read to pupils, and authors have come into school to work with different classes. During this inspection, for example, one member of staff injected fun and excitement into a simple story by putting different hats on her head to represent different characters. At the end of the day, a teacher-led story time happened in almost every classroom. Such enthusiasm for reading is infectious. Pupils report that they look forward to ‘Flappy Friday’, which is a special assembly when those pupils who have read with an adult at home everyday get to flap the pages of their reading records. Pupils who continue to struggle with reading receive well-planned support in the school’s reading hub. These sessions, often led by the school’s special educational needs leader, are calm, purposeful, fun and focused times when pupils are given warm encouragement and ambitious, yet realistic, targets. Indeed, the culture across the school is one of aspiration, and the school’s renewed attention to reading is paying off. Pupils in key stage 2 who shared some of their reading with me, read with interest and fluency. Furthermore, the school’s own assessment information shows that current pupils are on track to reach higher standards this year. Nevertheless, leaders know that there is still further to go. Consequently, raising standards in reading across key stage 2 remains the number one priority for the school. Another key priority is to strengthen the learning partnership with parents. While parents are content with the school’s work, you know there is scope to improve home-school links so that parents have a better understanding of how their children learn and how to help them at home. Staff have led workshops, both to explain to parents about aspects of school and to improve adult literacy. You and the governors have plans to build further on this aspect of the school’s work. Indeed, a very important message to communicate is the link between regular attendance at school and achievement. Currently, some pupils miss too much school without good cause. While the poor winter weather caused some 3 difficulties and possibly led to an increase in absence due to illness in the autumn and spring terms, this is no excuse for some instances of poor attendance. The school’s attendance officer and the school’s pastoral and inclusion staff are very much on the case. They work hard to forge constructive links with families and to support and challenge them as needs be. A range of incentives to reward good attendance has brought about some change for the better. For example, the proportion of pupils with 100% attendance has risen over time and, in the spring term of 2018, around 20% of pupils did not miss a day. Even so, finding ways to improve the attendance of regular absentees is an ongoing problem. Behaviour at the school is managed well and is usually good. Staff are consistent in their approach and pupils are treated with kind, firm fairness. Some challenging behaviour does flare up from time to time and staff deal with it properly and responsibly. There have been some fixed-term exclusions but the rate has reduced in recent times. In the 12-month period leading up to Easter 2017, for example, 25.5 school days were lost to exclusion. For the equivalent period up to Easter 2018, the loss reduced to 15 days. Staff record all incidents of difficult behaviour correctly, and support is put in place to minimise recurrence. Indeed, this inspection found several examples of the school’s support resulting in marked and sustained improvement in pupils’ behaviour and attitudes to school. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: the teaching of reading builds successfully on the positive start in early years and key stage 1 so that key stage 2 standards rise they work with families to improve the attendance of those pupils who miss too much school. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Telford and Wrekin. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Martin Pye Her Majesty’s Inspector Information about the inspection During the inspection, I met with you, other members of your leadership team and the teaching staff. I also met with three governors and the school’s business manager.

Millbrook Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 60% Agree 25% Disagree 5% Strongly Disagree 10% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>60, "agree"=>25, "disagree"=>5, "strongly_disagree"=>10, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018
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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

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Figures based on 20 responses up to 10-05-2018

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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