Ludham Primary School and Nursery
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
108
AGES
3 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Community school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
0344 800 8020

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(15/3/18)
Full Report - All Reports
70%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

School Road
Ludham
Great Yarmouth
NR29 5QN
01692678293

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. Ludham Primary School is a friendly, open and welcoming place where the best interests of the pupils drive everything that you do. Staff and pupils strive to meet the high expectations you have set for them. Teachers’ performance appraisal is now closely linked with how well pupils are doing and is reviewed regularly. You encourage staff to advance their own practice and do not let the size of the school prevent opportunities for leadership. You have the overwhelming support of parents, carers, staff members and the pupils themselves. Classroom visits show the school to be a very happy and industrious place. Relationships between teachers and pupils are very positive. You have worked hard to develop independence and resilience among your pupils, and this is evident in the way they approach the challenges set them by their teachers. Teachers have developed vibrant working walls in every classroom and ‘help desks’ where pupils can independently access a variety of resources to boost their vocabulary and support their learning. Pupils at Ludham Primary School are taught in classes of mixed year groups and, in most lessons I visited, teachers had planned activities that met the needs of all groups of pupils. For example, in a Years 1 and 2 science lesson, pupils were working in pairs to sort animals into a food chain. Although the task for the two year groups was similar, the teacher had given pupils in Year 2 less information to help them than pupils in Year 1. All pupils were absorbed in lively discussions, and the teacher used skilful questioning to direct or further challenge as required. Pupils want to do well, appreciate their teachers and enjoy coming to school. Their behaviour in lessons and around the school is exemplary. The Nursery and Reception class provides a good start for children and, historically, an above-average proportion of them have reached a good level of development by the time they begin Year 1. Staff quickly identify which areas children need support with and create activities to address these. For example, in order to move children on to early writing, teachers increased opportunities for them to develop strength and control in their fingers and hands. Staff also plan a variety of activities to help children develop their mark-making into writing. In the outdoors area, a new writing shed provides children with many different materials with which to write and draw. Pupils are encouraged to celebrate their differences and, in this way, develop a better understanding of how people in Britain today adopt a variety of beliefs and lifestyles. Pupils talked about how it is important to listen to the views of others even if you do not agree with them. They learn about values such as democracy through standing for the school council. Places on the school council are valued and pupils are proud of their achievements. In the week of the inspection, members of the school council were planting trees to create more shade for pupils in the summer months. Safeguarding is effective. Leaders and governors have ensured that all safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose, including checking that all procedures for the safe recruitment of staff are robust. Pupils said that they feel safe at school, and parents wholeheartedly agree that their children are safe and well looked after at school. Pupils are confident that staff would support them should they have any concerns. Your staff are well trained to identify vulnerable pupils, and your curriculum offers many opportunities for pupils to understand how to stay safe. For example, Years 5 and 6 pupils train to become digital leaders and teach younger pupils how to keep safe online. You ensure that all arrangements for safeguarding and for pupils’ welfare are rigorous and kept under continuous review. You maintain effective links with external agencies and actively seek support for families in order to benefit pupils’ academic, physical and emotional needs. Relationships with parents are good. Inspection findings At our first meeting, we agreed several key lines of enquiry to ascertain whether the school remains good. One of the areas I wanted to explore with you was how you are accelerating the progress that pupils, especially boys, make in writing so that far more of them reach the higher standard. This was an area for improvement from your previous inspection in 2014. Since then, you have consistently achieved outcomes in line with national averages. In 2017, the proportion of pupils who reached the expected standard in writing at key stage 1 and key stage 2 was again broadly average. However, a much lower proportion of pupils than in other schools nationally reached greater depth. Half of the pupils in Year 6 who took their tests at the end of key stage 2 in 2017 were late arrivals to Ludham Primary School. However, you have not used this as an excuse to justify the dip in outcomes. The two key areas that you have identified for improvement are widening the vocabulary of all of your pupils and building their confidence in applying grammatical structures in their writing. Evidence in the books of Year 6 pupils shows that the new focus on these areas is already having a positive impact. As part of your drive to raise the standard of writing, you are also working to engage children and parents in reading from the moment they start Nursery. Analysis of the 2017 reading assessments revealed that too few pupils confidently identified and explained the subtler meanings in texts. Too many pupils also lacked the stamina required to complete the end of key stage 2 reading test. You have introduced story cafes to teach parents how to improve comprehension when they read with their children at home. A new selection of quick reads has been provided to engage the interest of more reluctant readers among boys. In classrooms, inviting reading corners encourage pupils to lose themselves in a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts, and pupils have more time in lessons to read at length. I also discussed with you the provision for pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. These pupils make good progress. This is because teachers are given accurate information about how to support these pupils in the classroom and work effectively with teaching assistants, to ensure that teaching is adapted to meet their needs. Bespoke individual support is also promptly provided when required. Disadvantaged pupils also do well because you identify any barriers that slow their progress and rapidly put measures into place to address them. For example, you ensure that pupils who do not have many opportunities to read with adults at home have extra one-to-one reading time in school. Finally, I looked at the quality of the school’s curriculum. The learning environment reflects the rich diversity of topics and activities enjoyed by the pupils through striking and lively displays celebrating their work and experiences. You work relentlessly to give pupils opportunities to get involved in projects that really broaden their understanding of the world. An example of this is the ‘Tycoon in Schools’ project, where you were the youngest primary team to reach the national finals, held at Buckingham Palace. Such enterprises teach pupils about the reality of turning an idea into a business, helping to develop, for example, their understanding of finance and marketing. Pupils at Ludham have already become adept at raising money through their own enterprise to support charities such as Village Water. Teachers have the same high expectations of pupils in all subjects. Well-designed activities fire pupils’ curiosity and give them opportunities to apply their learning in a practical way. For example, pupils created constellations and planets in science and wrote simple children’s stories in French. Work in pupils’ books shows that pupils make good progress in their understanding across a range of subjects over time. You also provide a broad range of extra-curricular activities, especially in music and sport. Pupils can learn to play the ukulele, play volleyball or enjoy street dance; they can also join the sewing club or become part of the brass band. The quality of the curriculum is a strength of the school. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: teachers increase opportunities for pupils to widen their vocabulary and use a full range of grammatical structures in their writing so that more of them reach greater depth by the end of key stage 2 activities to improve reading build stamina and challenge all groups of pupils to develop confidence in reading and in understanding high-quality texts. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Norfolk. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Lesley Daniel Ofsted Inspector Information about the inspection During the inspection, I spoke with you and other leaders, members of the governing body and a representative from the local authority. I visited every classroom with you, where we looked at pupils’ work and talked to them about their learning. I also met with members of the school council. I considered the 21 responses to Ofsted’s online questionnaire for parents, Parent View, as well as the views of parents I spoke to during the inspection. I examined the school’s documentation, including the school’s improvement plan, your own review of the school’s effectiveness, and information relating to safeguarding and pupils’ progress.

Ludham Primary School and Nursery Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 85% Agree 15% Disagree 0% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>85, "agree"=>15, "disagree"=>0, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018
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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

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Figures based on 33 responses up to 15-03-2018

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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