Haberdashers' Adams
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Secondary
Post 16
PUPILS
1055
AGES
11 - 18
GENDER
Co-Ed & Boys Boarding
TYPE
Academy converter
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING

Can I Get My Child Into This School?

Enter a postcode to see where you live on the map
Very Likely
Likely
Less Likely

This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data, ONS

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

Good
NATIONAL AVG. 2.09
Ofsted Inspection
(10/05/2022)
Full Report - All Reports
100%
NATIONAL AVG. 38%
5+ GCSEs grade 9-4 (standard pass or above) including English and maths
98%
NATIONAL AVG. 45%
GCSE Grade 5 (strong pass) or above in both English and maths
73.7
Attainment 8 score
Results in 8 core subjects
NATIONAL AVERAGE 46.3
+0.4
Progress 8 score
SATs to GCSE
NATIONAL AVERAGE -0.03
35%
NATIONAL AVG. 11%
3 A levels at AAB or higher inc. two facilitating subjects
DATA
GUIDE

Secondary Data
Explained for parents
39.47
A level average point score
NATIONAL AVERAGE 35.48
B
Average A level result
NATIONAL AVERAGE B-
96%
NATIONAL AVG. 87%
Happiness Rating

Ofsted Parent View

19.9:1
NATIONAL AVG. 16.3:1
Pupil/Teacher ratio
13.9%
NATIONAL AVG. 27.7%
Persistent Absence
10.3%
NATIONAL AVG. 18.1%
Pupils first language
not English
6%
NATIONAL AVG. 27.1%
Free school meals
7.6%
NATIONAL AVG. 12.4%
Pupils with SEN support

Leaver Destinations

View

Progress Compared With All Other Schools

+ 0.4 GCSE Progress Score Well Below Average (About 15% of schools in England) Below Average (About 18% of schools in England) Average (About 35% of schools in England) Above Average (About 16% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 16% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2019 2022 2023 98% 99% 100% 2020 Covid-19 2021 Covid-19

% of pupils who achieved 5+ GCSEs grade 9-4
2019 2022 2023 95% 98% 98% 2020 Covid-19 2021 Covid-19

% of pupils who achieved GCSE grade 5 or above in both English and maths
2019 2022 2023 37% 40% 35% 2020 Covid-19 2021 Covid-19

% of pupils who achieved 3 A levels at AAB or higher
`

School Video

School Prospectus

High Street
Shropshire
Newport
TF10 7BD
01952953810

See News and Open Days from Haberdashers' Adams

School Description

This is a school at which staff provide high levels of both academic and pastoral care. The house system sits at the heart of school life. Pupils enjoy the various ways in which they can represent their house and the opportunities they are given to celebrate success. Pupils have a strong sense of belonging at the school and described the house system as like ‘being part of a family’. Pupils behave exceptionally well. They are mature, articulate young adults who show a hunger for learning. At break- and lunchtimes, pupils play together sensibly and are polite and respectful to both staff and their peers. Bullying is extremely rare and, when it does occur, it is dealt with swiftly by staff. Leaders are keen that pupils extend their learning at key stage 3 beyond their curriculum subjects. In Year 8, pupils have a ‘world affairs’ lecture once a week, and in Year 9, pupils complete an independent learning qualification. Pupils can select from a wide range of subjects at both GCSE and A level and achieve very well. Parents and carers are overwhelmingly positive about the school. They recognise and value the support their children are given. As one parent commented in response to Ofsted’s survey, ‘My son has flourished at this school both academically and emotionally.’ What does the school do well and what does it need to do better? In many subjects, the curriculum is well planned and sequenced. This is particularly the case at key stages 4 and 5. Leaders have thought carefully about what pupils need to know and how to build on their prior learning. In science, for example, leaders have constructed an effective curriculum that ensures that pupils can revisit learning and secure their understanding of key concepts. In this subject, pupils are confident in what they know, and they make strong progress. In some subjects at key stage 3, the sequencing of the curriculum is less clear. Not all departments have thought carefully as to the exact order in which topics are taught and what key concepts pupils need to know and build on. This sometimes means that pupils do not always remember as much as they could. Teachers are highly knowledgeable and are passionate advocates for their subject. They use this expertise very effectively to teach the curriculum. Teachers are keen to make sure that learning is accessible, and they provide real-life examples in lessons. In history, for example, when teaching about historical conflicts, teachers make connections with what is happening with the current war in Ukraine. This helps pupils to deepen their knowledge and understanding further. Teachers carry out effective checks on learning to see what pupils know and understand. Questioning is used extremely well to help teachers spot and pick up on errors and misconceptions quickly. Pupils make insightful spoken contributions in lessons and are proud to share their ideas with others. Inspection report: Haberdashers’ Adams 10 to 12 May 2022 2 Pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) are well supported. Leaders are ambitious for pupils with SEND and understand their individual needs. There are many ways in which the school broadens pupils’ development. Pupils can apply for many different leadership roles during their time at the school, such as various ‘captains’. The house system provides many opportunities for pupils to be involved in competitions. Large numbers participate in sport, music and dance events, as well as the whole-school cross-country run. The school offers a wealth of extra-curricular clubs. Pupils enjoy participating in activities such as musical theatre, choir and the school orchestra. Staff also run a popular and well-attended Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme. Leaders have put in place a programme for pupils’ personal, social and health education that is delivered through assemblies and ‘drop-down days’ (days on which the normal timetable is replaced with activities based on personal development and skills). These covers various topics throughout the year. However, the school’s curriculum on relationships and sex education (RSE) is not coherently planned or sequenced. Leaders recognise that they have not thought carefully enough about how pupils, including students in the sixth form, build their understanding of topics such as healthy relationships in an age-appropriate way. Some pupils therefore do not have a sufficiently secure understanding of these issues. Leaders have recently begun to address this by appointing a member of staff with specific responsibility for this area. Leaders provide effective careers information and guidance to pupils. The school runs an annual careers fair and regularly invites local colleges and apprenticeship providers to talk to pupils about the options that are available to them. All pupils in Year 11 receive a careers interview and appreciate the opportunity to discuss their next steps. Students in the sixth form participate in a ‘progression week’ each year where they develop their skills in writing a CV and a personal statement. They also receive talks from former students or parents working or studying in areas such as medicine and law. As a result, a very high number of students go on to study at Russell Group universities. Trustees and governors are rightly proud of the work the school has done in recent years. However, they are less clear about the rationale for the key stage 3 curriculum and have not sufficiently held leaders to account for implementing the RSE policy. They recognise this and have already taken action.

News, Photos and Open Days from Haberdashers' Adams
Last update: 24 June 2024
HABERDASHER ADAMS OPEN WEEK - 22ND-25TH JANUARY 2024

  

For prospective pupils in Year 5 looking for September 2025 Entry and prospective pupils in Year 11 looking for September 2024 Entry into the Sixth Form. 

“A wonderful state grammar with stellar academic standards and a multitude of enrichment activities on offer to create real depth of character. Boarding is incredible for the price.” 

Haberdasher’s Adams offers boys (aged 11-18) a boarding school education from £4,619 per term. As a selective state grammar school, you just pay for the costs associated with boarding. This makes Haberdashers’ Adams an excellent alternative to the independent sector. 

Book a visit

 

NEW DEPUTY HEAD ANNOUNCEMENT

 

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Mrs Ruth Crichton as our new Deputy Head in charge of Curriculum.

Mrs Crichton has over twenty years of teaching experience in secondary education in the West Midlands. She began her career as a Geography teacher, with a love of the outdoors and the natural environment. With ten years’ experience as a senior leader in both comprehensive and grammar schools, Mrs Crichton has had responsibility for overseeing the quality of education, teaching, learning and curriculum.

Commenting on the appointment, Mrs Crichton said: “I’m very excited about joining Haberdashers’ Adams with its strong legacy of successful students and where the quality of provision is already excellent. I am looking forward to working with staff, students and the whole school community to further enhance the Adams provision for each and every student.”

Mrs Crichton joins Haberdashers’ Adams after Easter to work alongside Dr Pack for the summer term
before taking over fully in September.

 

ATOM LEARNING PARTNERSHIP

 

Haberdashers’ Adams has partnered with Atom Learning to break down barriers to education for
disadvantaged children.


Atom Learning, an online learning platform, will offer a free subscription to all children aged 7-11 who
are eligible for Pupil Premium across Telford & Wrekin (usually priced at £575.90 per year). The Pupil
Premium Grant supports state-funded schools in England to improve outcomes for disadvantaged
children. Students who qualify will receive complimentary access to Atom Home, an adaptive learning
platform designed to prepare children for the 11+ exam and master the Key Stage 2 national
curriculum. The programme is designed to benefit all children, whatever their current attainment level
and regardless of whether they are planning to apply to a grammar school.


Dr Kate Hibbs, Head of Outreach, comments: “Haberdashers' Adams has a long track record of
promoting social mobility through our Outreach Programme and by prioritising admission of
disadvantaged pupils. We hope that our partnership with Atom will help to improve educational
outcomes at Key Stage 2 for disadvantaged children from across the borough, whatever their future
aspirations.”


Headmaster, Mr Hickey, said: “When I first became Headmaster of Adams over a decade ago, my
mission was one centred on social mobility and equality. This mission was behind the expansion of the
school and the move to go fully co-ed. The partnership with Atom is another stepping stone in the right
direction, enabling disadvantaged children to thrive in their education and helping to ensure that they
do not miss out on opportunities.”


Flo Simpson, Chief Operating officer at Atom Learning commented: “At Atom, our mission is to make
exceptional education accessible to all and we are truly excited to partner with Haberdashers’ Adams.
This partnership will bring our learning content and technology to even more families. We firmly
believe that our platform empowers children to not only excel in their exams, but also to build lasting
confidence and pave their path to success throughout Key Stage 3 and beyond.”

Haberdashers' Adams Parent Reviews



93% Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 66% Agree 30% Disagree 2% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>66, "agree"=>30, "disagree"=>2, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 71% Agree 26% Disagree 2% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>71, "agree"=>26, "disagree"=>2, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 62% Agree 33% Disagree 2% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 2% {"strongly_agree"=>62, "agree"=>33, "disagree"=>2, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
My Child Has Not Been Bullied 79% Strongly Agree 4% Agree 6% Disagree 3% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 6% {"my_child_has_not_been_bullied"=>79, "strongly_agree"=>4, "agree"=>6, "disagree"=>3, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>6} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 39% Agree 38% Disagree 15% Strongly Disagree 4% Don't Know 4% {"strongly_agree"=>39, "agree"=>38, "disagree"=>15, "strongly_disagree"=>4, "dont_know"=>4} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
I Have Not Raised Any Concerns 42% Strongly Agree 30% Agree 18% Disagree 6% Strongly Disagree 3% Don't Know 2% {"i_have_not_raised_any_concerns"=>42, "strongly_agree"=>30, "agree"=>18, "disagree"=>6, "strongly_disagree"=>3, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 30% Agree 35% Disagree 20% Strongly Disagree 15% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>30, "agree"=>35, "disagree"=>20, "strongly_disagree"=>15, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 20 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 75% Agree 19% Disagree 2% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 2% {"strongly_agree"=>75, "agree"=>19, "disagree"=>2, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 64% Agree 27% Disagree 5% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 2% {"strongly_agree"=>64, "agree"=>27, "disagree"=>5, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 65% Agree 31% Disagree 3% Strongly Disagree 2% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>65, "agree"=>31, "disagree"=>3, "strongly_disagree"=>2, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 59% Agree 35% Disagree 4% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 2% {"strongly_agree"=>59, "agree"=>35, "disagree"=>4, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>2} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 60% Agree 33% Disagree 3% Strongly Disagree 1% Don't Know 3% {"strongly_agree"=>60, "agree"=>33, "disagree"=>3, "strongly_disagree"=>1, "dont_know"=>3} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 54% Agree 33% Disagree 6% Strongly Disagree 2% Don't Know 5% {"strongly_agree"=>54, "agree"=>33, "disagree"=>6, "strongly_disagree"=>2, "dont_know"=>5} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Yes 93% No 7% {"yes"=>93, "no"=>7} Figures based on 325 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 42% Agree 42% Disagree 9% Strongly Disagree 6% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>42, "agree"=>42, "disagree"=>9, "strongly_disagree"=>6, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 48% Agree 45% Disagree 6% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>48, "agree"=>45, "disagree"=>6, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 48% Agree 33% Disagree 9% Strongly Disagree 9% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>48, "agree"=>33, "disagree"=>9, "strongly_disagree"=>9, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 48% Agree 48% Disagree 3% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>48, "agree"=>48, "disagree"=>3, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 12-05-2022
Strongly Agree 42% Agree 36% Disagree 15% Strongly Disagree 6% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>42, "agree"=>36, "disagree"=>15, "strongly_disagree"=>6, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 33 responses up to 12-05-2022

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

Your rating:
Review guidelines
  • Do explain who you are and your relationship to the school e.g. ‘I am a parent…’
  • Do back up your opinion with examples or clear reasons but, remember, it’s your opinion not fact.
  • Don’t use bad or aggressive language.
  • Don't go in to detail about specific staff or pupils. Individual complaints should be directed to the school.
  • Do go to the relevant authority is you have concerns about a serious issue such as bullying, drug abuse or bad management.
Read the full review guidelines and where to find help if you have serious concerns about a school.
We respect your privacy and never share your email address with the reviewed school or any third parties. Please see our T&Cs and Privacy Policy for details of how we treat registered emails with TLC.