Edmund de Moundeford VC Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
198
AGES
5 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Voluntary controlled school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
0344 800 8020

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(23/5/17)
Full Report - All Reports
50%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

The Beck
Feltwell
Thetford
IP26 4DB
01842828334

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You and the deputy headteacher make a strong team in driving improvement. You are very ably supported by governors, many of whom have educational expertise. Together, you have created a school ethos that is ambitious and optimistic. Pupils are given the confidence to push themselves to their full potential. This is a happy school where pupils feel safe and valued as individuals. Parents who spoke to me were very positive about their children’s experiences. They said that their children were happy and learning well. This is also the case in the early years, where improvement in the provision has led to a steep rise in the proportion of children reaching a good level of development by the end of the Reception Year. Pupils enjoy their roles as ‘learning leaders’ visiting different classes with senior leaders and commenting upon what they feel works well and making suggestions for things to be even better. A pupil told me, ‘We had to do your job and ask people questions about their learning.’ Teaching continues to improve. It is good across the school and pupils make good progress. Teachers have the opportunity to share best practice and learn from one another’s strengths. Rigorous monitoring ensures that teaching staff receive precise feedback about how they can improve their work. You invest a lot in staff training. You encourage members of staff to pursue their interests and to develop specialisms, for example in supporting pupils on the autistic spectrum. Performance management is rigorous. Teaching staff are given challenging targets linked to the progress of pupils and whole-school priorities and you ensure that they meet them. At the time of the previous inspection, the school was asked to raise standards of work and improve achievement in mathematics. You have been successful in bringing this about. In the 2016 national assessments for Year 2 pupils, standards in mathematics were above average both at the expected standard and at greater depth. While standards at the end of Year 6 in 2016 were not so strong, there were particular factors affecting that year group, including pupils arriving late in their school career. Work in books for current pupils shows that they are making good progress over time in mathematics and that standards are at least in line with expectations in each year group. Pupils have plenty of opportunities to reason and solve problems. For example, Year 4 pupils were asked to work out ‘how many legs are there in the school?’ At the previous inspection, the school was also asked to develop pupils’ writing. Pupils did well in the 2016 assessments at the end of both key stages, especially at greater depth. In many classes, displays of good-quality writing show that pupils are writing in a variety of genres and for different audiences. In Year 6, pupils were inspired by Ernest Shackleton’s adventures in the Antarctic. One pupil, describing the journey from Elephant Island, wrote, ‘The boat tossed and tumbled through the gale-swept seas.’ The school’s focus on accuracy and presentation has resulted in improvements in handwriting and fewer careless mistakes. However, this year standards in writing are not quite as strong as in reading and mathematics. This is partly because sometimes teachers do not make the most of opportunities to extend the most able pupils’ writing in interesting and creative ways, especially in subjects other than English. At times, the task is too prescribed and this limits the amount of originality and flair pupils can bring to accomplishing the objective, for example in providing an account of the Great Fire of London. The school has a well-justified reputation for success in sport – pupils participate in many clubs, and benefit from using the school’s own indoor swimming pool. The rich curriculum builds on pupils’ interests, including trips to places of interest and live performances such as ‘STOMP’ the musical. The school caters well for pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, ensuring that they understand British values and are well equipped for life in today’s society. The ‘nurture group’ is a new initiative to help pupils grow in confidence and develop their social skills. The small number of pupils who attend are already making new friendships and trying out new activities. The deputy headteacher ensures that the needs of pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities are supported well so that they make good progress. Safeguarding is effective. The school ensures that procedures are rigorous and that all children are kept safe. Leaders keep very careful records of their work. They work closely with outside agencies, parents and carers to ensure that pupils are protected. Training is thorough and up to date. All policies are followed to ensure that suitable people are employed to work with children. Leaders follow up any concerns about children’s welfare assiduously. A monthly newsletter for staff keeps them abreast of best practice and reminds them of the school’s very high expectations. The school’s website contains much useful information for pupils and parents with helpful links to other organisations, especially around e-safety. All pupils have their own e-safety journal to remind them about how to use the internet safely. Inspection findings At our initial meeting, we agreed together some key lines of enquiry to explore so that I could be satisfied that the school remains good. First of all, we considered progress and attainment in reading, as the outcomes in 2016 were below average. You recognised pupils’ attainment and progress were disappointing in 2016. You attributed this to weaknesses in pupils’ comprehension skills and a lack of stamina to complete the test. You introduced new approaches to teaching reading and promoting pupils’ interest. They focused on developing pupils’ ability to infer meaning from text and invested in new resources. Teachers asked each pupil in a reading group to take on a specific role such as asking questions or finding out the meaning of new words. New initiatives raised the profile of reading, such as the creation of attractive reading areas in each classroom and the encouragement of pupils to celebrate the books they had read. In key stage 2, teachers created ‘caterpillars’ across the walls, where each segment portrayed a pupil with a book they had enjoyed reading. Pupils who read to me were fluent and confident and able to talk about the books they enjoyed and answer questions about their reading. As a result of these steps to improve reading, progress has accelerated and standards have risen across the school. Hardly any pupils are below age-related expectations in reading. The second line of enquiry we agreed was how effectively leaders are spending the pupil premium to ensure that differences are reducing between disadvantaged pupils and others nationally. In the 2016 tests, disadvantaged pupils did not do as well as the others. We also agreed I should consider how well pupils from Forces families are doing, as they form a significant group within the school and also receive some additional government funding. Leaders and governors track the impact of pupil premium spending very closely. You review pupils’ progress and attainment every half term. You hold teachers rigorously to account for how well the pupils are doing and ask them to identify the reasons why anybody is not keeping up with the others. The deputy headteacher measures the impact of interventions meticulously to ensure value for money. Some have been discontinued, where the outcomes in pupils’ performance were not evident. You keep careful records of how each pupil benefits from the use of the pupil premium, including the most able disadvantaged pupils. The school’s internal data for current pupils shows that a high proportion of pupils are making good or better progress. Only a very few disadvantaged pupils are not at age-related expectations or above in reading and mathematics. There are a few more not doing so well in writing, but half of these have additional needs. As a result of the effective work with disadvantaged pupils, what differences remain with other pupils are reducing rapidly. Pupils from Forces families make the same good progress as other pupils, even though some of them have had a more interrupted education because of previous moves between countries. Some of these pupils missed out on a Reception Year, for example. The final key line of enquiry we agreed related to the attendance of pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals. Their attendance has been below that of other groups of pupils. You track the attendance of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals very closely and work with families to support them in getting their children to school regularly. Some particular factors contributed to the low attendance last year, including pupils with complex medical conditions and the absence of pupils from Forces families for legitimate operational reasons. The school’s attendance data for the current year shows that the attendance of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals has much improved. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: attainment in writing increases to match that in reading and mathematics, including for disadvantaged pupils the most able pupils have more opportunities to present their work in interesting and creative ways that extend their learning. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Norfolk. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Nick Butt Ofsted Inspector Information about the inspection During the inspection, meetings were held with you, other school leaders, the chair and vice-chair of governors, administrative staff and pupils. Short visits were made to all classrooms, where books were scrutinised. A range of documents, policies and assessment information was examined. Questionnaire responses from parents, pupils and staff were also considered.

Edmund de Moundeford VC Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 81% Agree 15% Disagree 4% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>81, "agree"=>15, "disagree"=>4, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017
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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

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Figures based on 26 responses up to 23-05-2017

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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