Duchy of Lancaster Methwold CofE Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
103
AGES
5 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Academy converter
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
0344 800 8020

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(29/3/17)
Full Report - All Reports
50%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Hythe Road
Methwold
Thetford
IP26 4PP
01366728280

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the previous inspection. You have deployed your strong leadership skills to very good effect in addressing a number of challenges the school has faced. You used your evaluative skills and judgement to quickly and accurately identify the school’s strengths and areas for improvement. Your head of school has recently left due to promotion. You have taken the opportunity to review the leadership structure of the three schools in the Trinity Partnership and have appointed a highly experienced senior leader who is to be executive deputy headteacher of all three schools. You also have plans in place to appoint a head of inclusion, and either this person or the executive deputy headteacher will be based in this school. These arrangements are well considered and aim to secure stability and continued strong and strategic leadership in the years to come. When I met with your early years leader and the leaders of English and mathematics, I was impressed with their insightful knowledge and understanding of how their roles make a difference in continuing to improve pupils’ outcomes. The early years leader spoke proudly about how one learning activity leads smoothly into the next one in Reception Year, and how she has engaged more parents in contributing to your online assessment system of children’s progress. The early years leader also acknowledged that the children’s outdoor space could be further developed through the addition of more resources, and that children’s understanding of number remains an area for improvement. Your newly appointed English leader is highly regarded by members of staff. She has conveyed a clear message that all teachers are accountable for pupils’ outcomes in English, and not solely those in Year 2 and Year 6. Your mathematics leader demonstrated a very good understanding of the concept of mastery. You have chosen to teach mathematics as a discrete subject, and this is having a positive impact on pupils’ outcomes. The small school is a happy and welcoming environment. Classrooms and corridors are adorned with colourful displays which model good writing and which celebrate pupils’ work. Pupils are proud of their school. They wear their uniform smartly and behave very well. No pupils have been excluded from school for a number of years, which is testament to your high expectations and care and support. Each class also has their own outdoor space and pupils have a say as to how this space is set up. The governing body is responsible for the governance arrangements of this school and the two others in the Trinity Partnership. Between them, the governors have a good range of skills covering finance, education and safeguarding. They visit the school regularly. They use the school improvement plan to monitor, evaluate and review your work and that of other leaders. My scrutiny of minutes of governors’ meetings shows that governors ask pertinent and challenging questions of you and your senior leadership team. They also focus sharply on the performance of different groups of pupils when challenging leaders about pupils’ outcomes. The number of pupils in your Year 6 cohort for 2016 was very small at eight. Only one of these had been at the school for their whole school career. Being aware that the achievement of such a small cohort is difficult to compare with national averages, I considered a number of case studies for these pupils, as well as looking at information on their individual progress. Nearly all of these pupils had extenuating circumstances which impacted on their progress, despite your best efforts. Hence, published data on their achievement does not look positive. However, I am certain that most of these pupils made effective progress during the time they were in your school, and that you could have done very little more to support them. Safeguarding is effective. Safeguarding children is a strong aspect of this school’s provision. All staff have received and read the latest guidance ‘Keeping children safe in education’ (2016) and demonstrated a strong awareness of safeguarding issues. All staff have also undergone training in the government’s ‘Prevent’ duty. Staff, including those who join the school mid-year, receive up-to-date training on safeguarding matters. The school’s record of recruitment checks on the suitability of staff is compliant with current requirements. Pupils are taught well about keeping safe, including e-safety. On the day of this inspection, a police community service officer had been invited to the school to talk to pupils about the risks associated with using social networking sites. Records kept by the school of children who are at risk or deemed to be vulnerable are very well maintained and informative, with details of resolution. They are kept securely and appropriate external agencies are informed as and when necessary. Inspection findings My first line of enquiry looked at actions taken by the school’s leaders to address weaknesses in mathematics in key stages 1 and 2. Having considered the curriculum carefully and its impact on pupils’ outcomes, you took the decision to teach mathematics as a discrete subject. This also meant that the subject plans had to be remodelled to meet this requirement. These plans, and my observations of mathematics teaching, confirm that the needs of individual pupils are being met better than previously. Teachers have a good understanding of the concept of mastery, and my scrutiny of pupils’ books shows that pupils are acquiring a deeper knowledge and understanding of mathematical skills and concepts. They are able to apply these skills more consistently. Your subject leader for mathematics also led a successful training day for staff to launch the new calculation policy. As a result of staff implementing this policy, greater progression in calculation can be seen from Reception Year to Year 6. Your achievement information for current pupils in mathematics demonstrates that the strategies you have deployed are reaping rewards. Apart from Year 1, progress in mathematics has improved, but can still improve further. Your Year 6 pupils have just sat last year’s arithmetic paper as a practice exercise, and the results were pleasing, although the differences between disadvantaged pupils and others have not yet diminished. For my second line of enquiry, I looked at the progress being made by pupils currently in the school. I reviewed your current information on pupils’ progress, observed the quality of teaching pupils typically experience and looked at the work in their books. Progress being made across the school is largely positive. You acknowledge that more boys could achieve age-related expectations in Year 3 and that boys would benefit from more guided reading in Year 1. Pupils also told me in my discussions that they would welcome more up-to-date reading books in the library. Your English subject leader also acknowledged that some of your guided reading resources are outdated. I observed pupils in Years 5 and 6 taking part in an exciting and active mathematics lesson which had been very well planned to meet their needs. The Year 6 pupils were using proportions and ratios to work out the ingredients for a cupcake recipe. This activity was linked to food technology and enterprise, as they then went on to bake the cupcakes and planned to sell these at a profit to fund a Year 6 activity. The so-called ‘Duchy dealers’ showed great enthusiasm when attempting this task, and used their mathematical skills to good effect. My third line of enquiry looked at how well you are addressing the lower attendance of pupils who receive special educational needs support, albeit this is a very small proportion of your total number of pupils on roll. Your overall attendance for September to March is slightly below your target of 96%. The attendance of pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities, although still below that of their classmates, is improving. Your school secretary is meticulous in the way she monitors pupils’ attendance and follows up any firstday absences. She produces a weekly attendance summary which enables you to quickly identify any patterns or trends. You have also worked productively with the attendance officer from Norfolk County Council to help reduce cases of persistent absence. You have also dedicated a room for more vulnerable pupils and this is managed by well-trained members of staff who carry out effective work with pupils who may attend less regularly than their peers or who have low self-esteem. This work has helped to improve pupils’ emotional resilience. My final line of enquiry looked at how your links with the two other schools in the Trinity Partnership have contributed towards school improvement and benefited this school. The fact that you are executive headteacher of this and the two other primary schools in the partnership enables you to have an effective oversight of what works well in one school, and to share the good practice when this is required. Examples of this collaborative work include establishing common systems for assessing pupils’ work in reading, writing, mathematics and grammar, punctuation and spelling. Staff across the three partner schools moderate each other’s assessments in order to establish a more accurate picture of how well pupils are progressing in these subjects. The fact that one governing body is responsible for all three schools also means that governors can identify what works well in one school, and challenge why it is less effective in another. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: The outdoor space for early years is enhanced by the addition of further resources, and children’s understanding of number is developed further. Progress in key stage 1 is more rapid, particularly in Year 1, and boys’ progress in Year 3 improves. The recently introduced initiatives in mathematics demonstrate their impact through improved outcomes by the end of the academic year. The outdated guided reading books are reviewed so that they meet the needs of pupils better, particularly of boys in Year 1.

Duchy of Lancaster Methwold CofE Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 72% Agree 22% Disagree 0% Strongly Disagree 6% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>72, "agree"=>22, "disagree"=>0, "strongly_disagree"=>6, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017
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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

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Figures based on 18 responses up to 29-03-2017

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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