Dinton CofE Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
83
AGES
4 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Voluntary controlled school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
unlock
UNLOCK

Can I Get My Child Into This School?

Enter a postcode to see where you live on the map
heatmap example
Sample Map Only
Very Likely
Likely
Less Likely

This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
01225 713010

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(23/1/19)
Full Report - All Reports
57%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



Unlock the rest of the data now
  • See All Official School Data
  • View Catchment Area Maps
  • Access 2022 League Tables
  • Read Real Parent Reviews
  • Unlock 2022 Star Ratings
  • Easily Choose Your #1 School
£14.95
Per month


Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

Hindon Road
Dinton
Salisbury
SP3 5HW
01722716221

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You have taken effective action on the previous inspection recommendations, which concerned marking and writing. Teachers apply the school marking policy and pupils say that they find it very useful in helping them to improve their work. You have also improved writing. Teachers pay close attention to spelling and punctuation in writing across the curriculum, and pupils’ written work is generally neat. Key stage 2 writing progress was in the top 20% nationally in 2017 and remained strong in 2018. Your clear vision for improvement is underpinned by effective use of data and shared by staff. You and your leaders of literacy and mathematics work closely together to ensure that the school continues to move forward. They have developed innovative strategies to improve spelling across the school and number work in key stage 2. You are monitoring these closely and can show that they are starting to have a positive impact. Governance is effective. The governors to whom I spoke know the school well and understand what it is trying to improve. They pay due attention to long-term planning and likely changes in the size of the school’s roll. They provide challenge and fulfil key statutory requirements, though information about the governing body needs updating on the school website. Governors appreciate and support the school’s ethos, which is based on learning and British and Christian values. The school makes sure that work is planned effectively for the mixed-age classes. You teach pupils the full curriculum for their age through a two-year programme. It is designed to interest them and make links between the things they are learning. Pupils talked of the fun they had and what they had learned in weeks with a particular focus such as ‘art week’ and ‘fair trade week’. They were keen to point out that they did not stop learning other subjects during these weeks – but that they learned more. Year 6 pupils told me how they had improved their play in new sports such as hockey. The Year 6 pupils spoke very maturely to me about how it feels to be a pupil and their views of the distinctiveness of the school. They take a range of responsibilities and feel the school listens to them. Pupils across the different year groups say that they are happy and value the relationships they have with others of all ages. One pointed out how being happy helps them to be ready to learn, saying: ‘You can make a lot of friends. Making friends means they can teach you more.’ Almost all staff and parents who responded to the inspection questionnaires were very positive. Some parents wrote extremely positive comments such as, ‘We have no concerns and only praise for the way the school is run,’ or, ‘Even if I won the lottery I would carry on sending my son to this school.’ You know from your own summer questionnaires that a very few parents have concerns about communication and you are taking steps to address this. Most parents and staff feel discipline is effective. You recognise that one or two pupils need support with behaviour, and you are drawing on external expertise to secure this. Safeguarding is effective. The leadership team has ensured that all safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose. The school carries out the required checks on adults who work or volunteer in the school. Training is carried out regularly, including on the ‘Prevent’ duty. Staff I spoke to knew exactly what to do if they had worries about a pupil, and you have clear forms to record concerns. You listen to and act on any concerns, doing the right things to safeguard children, drawing on advice from social services. You review premises safety and have taken steps to improve this where needed. All the pupils I spoke to said that they felt safe in school, a view very strongly supported by your own pupil questionnaires last summer. They told me who they could go to if they had a problem, and several praised the work of the emotional literacy support assistant. They said there was very little bullying and that it was dealt with if it occurred. Lunchtime is effectively supervised. Staff join in and encourage good play. Inspection findings During this inspection I focused on three lines of enquiry: progress in mathematics in key stage 2; how well pupils of middle ability in Years 1 to 4 build on previous learning; and how well children’s needs are met in the mixed early years and Year 1 class, particularly in writing. Standards can vary from year to year because this is a small school, but taking the last three years together, the standards reached by pupils in Year 6 have been much lower in mathematics than in reading. Reading is a particular strength, with the 2018 Year 6 pupils making progress that was in the top 20% of schools nationally. However, progress in mathematics has lagged behind progress in writing as well as in reading. You recognised this and you have taken effective steps to improve mathematics in key stage 2. You analysed pupils’ areas of weakness in mathematics and have introduced guided number sessions in which pupils work in ability groups to strengthen their arithmetic. They find these sessions very useful and their skills are improving. Their work shows that this focus is complemented by challenging problem-solving and mathematical investigation. Teachers are very effective in encouraging pupils to understand mathematics as well as complete sums correctly. You agree that work in mathematics in key stage 1 has not yet been developed to the same standard. In 2017, some Year 2 pupils did not reach expected standards despite meeting expected goals when they left Reception. The specific pupils were identified at the time and have been monitored closely through Years 3 and 4. Most of these pupils have caught up effectively, in both mathematics and English. Where there is more to do, the school has identified pupils’ specific needs and is working on them. The 2018 results show that Year 2 pupils made good progress from expected standards at the end of Reception. Standards at the end of Reception vary because numbers are small and children enter the school with different abilities. However, there is variation between what the same pupils achieve in different areas. For example, in 2018 all the children did well and reached expected standards in communication and language, in physical development and in personal, social and emotional development. However, only about two thirds reached the expected standard in writing. In 2017 all the children reached the expected standard in reading but only half reached it in writing. In the work we looked at from the Year R/1 class, some pupils were making strong progress in writing. These tended to be the most able children. A few were making slower progress. The school recognises that this is an area for further work. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that: the good knowledge and understanding of mathematics being developed in key stage 2 are extended into key stage 1 children’s progress in writing improves in the early years to mirror that made in reading and other areas of the curriculum. I am copying this letter to the chair of the governing body, the regional schools commissioner and the director of children’s services for Wiltshire. This letter will be published on the Ofsted website. Yours sincerely Deborah Zachary Ofsted Inspector Information about the inspection I met with you and, separately, your literacy and mathematics leaders, to discuss the work of the school, the progress pupils make and the steps you take to safeguard pupils. You and I visited all classrooms together. We also studied pupils’ key stage 1 and 2 mathematics work, some Year 4 writing work, and examples of writing individual pupils had done at different stages of Reception and Year 1. I met with a group of Year 6 pupils, and I talked to a range of other pupils in the playground. I took account of six responses to the pupils’ Ofsted questionnaire and the 92 pupils’ responses to the school’s own 2018 questionnaire. I held meetings with three governors and had a telephone conversation with the school’s local authority challenge and support partner. I talked to staff informally and took account of nine responses to the staff questionnaire. I looked at 16 responses to Ofsted’s online questionnaire, Parent View, together with 10 written comments. I also took account of the results of the school’s own questionnaires for gathering parents’ views.

Dinton CofE Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 58% Agree 32% Disagree 11% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>58, "agree"=>32, "disagree"=>11, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019
unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

unlock

Figures based on 19 responses up to 23-01-2019

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

Your rating:
Review guidelines
  • Do explain who you are and your relationship to the school e.g. ‘I am a parent…’
  • Do back up your opinion with examples or clear reasons but, remember, it’s your opinion not fact.
  • Don’t use bad or aggressive language.
  • Don't go in to detail about specific staff or pupils. Individual complaints should be directed to the school.
  • Do go to the relevant authority is you have concerns about a serious issue such as bullying, drug abuse or bad management.
Read the full review guidelines and where to find help if you have serious concerns about a school.
We respect your privacy and never share your email address with the reviewed school or any third parties. Please see our T&Cs and Privacy Policy for details of how we treat registered emails with TLC.


News, Photos and Open Days from Dinton CofE Primary School

We are waiting for this school to upload information. Represent this school?
Register your details to add open days, photos and news.

Do you represent
Dinton CofE Primary School?

Register to add photos, news and download your Certificate of Excellence 2021/22

*Official school administrator email addresses

(eg [email protected]). Details will be verified.

Questions? Email [email protected]

We're here to help your school to add information for parents.

Thank you for registering your details

A member of the School Guide team will verify your details within 2 working days and provide further detailed instructions for setting up your School Noticeboard.

For any questions please email [email protected]