St Mary's Church of England Primary School
Catchment Area, Reviews and Key Information

Primary
PUPILS
367
AGES
4 - 11
GENDER
Mixed
TYPE
Voluntary controlled school
SCHOOL GUIDE RATING
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Can I Get My Child Into This School?

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This pupil heat map shows where pupils currently attending the school live.
The concentration of pupils shows likelihood of admission based on distance criteria

Source: All attending pupils National School Census Data 2021, ONS
01225 713010

This School Guide heat map has been plotted using official pupil data taken from the last School Census collected by the Department for Education. It is a visualisation of where pupils lived at the time of the annual School Census.

Our heat maps use groups of postcodes, not individual postcodes, and have naturally soft edges. All pupils are included in the mapping (i.e. children with siblings already at the school, high priority pupils and selective and/or religious admissions) but we may have removed statistical ‘outliers’ with more remote postcodes that do not reflect majority admissions.

For some schools, the heat map may be a useful indicator of the catchment area but our heat maps are not the same as catchment area maps. Catchment area maps, published by the school or local authority, are based on geographical admissions criteria and show actual cut-off distances and pre-defined catchment areas for a single admission year.

This information is provided as a guide only. The criteria in which schools use to allocate places in the event that they are oversubscribed can and do vary between schools and over time. These criteria can include distance from the school and sometimes specific catchment areas but can also include, amongst others, priority for siblings, children of a particular faith or specific feeder schools. Living in an area where children have previously attended a school does not guarantee admission to the school in future years. Always check with the school’s own admission authority for the current admission arrangements.

3 steps to help parents gather catchment information for a school:

  1. Look at our school catchment area guide for more information on heat maps. They give a useful indicator of the general areas that admit pupils to the school. This visualisation is based on all attending pupils present at the time of the annual School Census.
  2. Use the link to the Local Authority Contact (above) to find catchment area information based on a single admission year. This is very important if you are considering applying to a school.
  3. On each school page, use the link to visit the school website and find information on individual school admissions criteria. Geographical criteria are only applied after pupils have been admitted on higher priority criteria such as Looked After Children, SEN, siblings, etc.

How Does The School Perform?

4 1 1 2 3 4
NATIONAL AVG. 2.08
Ofsted Inspection
(16/11/17)
Full Report - All Reports
62%
NATIONAL AVG. 65%
% pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics



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Progress Compared With All Other Schools

UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 8% of schools in England) Average (About 67% of schools in England) Above Average (About 5% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 7% of schools in England) Average (About 64% of schools in England) Above Average (About 9% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) UNLOCK Well Below Average (About 10% of schools in England) Below Average (About 11% of schools in England) Average (About 58% of schools in England) Above Average (About 10% of schools in England) Well Above Average (About 10% of schools in England)

School Results Over Time

2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the expected standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)
2017 2018 2019 UNLOCK

% pupils meeting the higher standard in Key Stage 2 tests (age 11)

These results over time show historic performance for key exam results. We show pre-pandemic results as the fairest indicator of whether performance is up, down or stable

College Road
Purton
Swindon
SN5 4AR
01793770239

School Description

The leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the school since the last inspection. You work closely with the deputy headteacher. Together, you have made many improvements to teaching and learning. You have made sure that teaching staff understand the nature of the changing cohort of pupils. You have added capacity to the leadership of the school. The new special educational needs coordinator (SENCo) is well qualified. She has a secure grasp of the emotional and cognitive needs of the pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. The leader in charge of the funding for disadvantaged pupils evaluates the impact of her planning carefully. These factors have sustained improvements. The pupil population has changed since the last inspection. There has been extensive housebuilding locally, resulting in an increase in the pupil population. The local community recognises the strengths of your leadership. Ninety seven per cent of parents said on Parent View, Ofsted’s online survey, that they would recommend the school. There are 30 children who travel to school by taxi and bus from outlying areas within the catchment. You run a very inclusive school. There are more pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities. Many have highly complex histories. Their emotional needs are being met well. Recently, you have employed a leader in charge of pupils’ welfare. Her work has been invaluable. Some pupils arrive at the school for just a few years because they are children of workers at a neighbouring Japanese factory. You use a translator to help the pupils learn and integrate effectively into school life. Since the last inspection, you have maintained an effective tracking system. You check pupils’ progress regularly. If pupils are slipping behind, they are supported well. You make sure that teaching assistants support pupils’ reading, writing and mathematics as necessary. This is helping current pupils to achieve their potential. Safeguarding is effective. Governors and the leadership team have ensured that safeguarding arrangements are fit for purpose. Records are of a high quality and detailed. Staff receive training on how to keep pupils safe from abuse, sexual exploitation and the influences of radicalisation and extremism. You are the designated safeguarding lead and you work closely with the two deputy leads. This is important with the increasing numbers of pupils who have complex needs. Collectively, you make sure that pupils are safe and secure in school. You work determinedly, yet sensitively, with pupils, parents and external agencies to monitor and support the most vulnerable pupils. Safeguarding arrangements are secure and part of the school’s culture. Inspection findings We discussed the progress of pupils in key stages 1 and 2. Pupils with low ability and the most able pupils had not achieved well in the end-of-key-stage tests. Despite some rapid progress in the outcomes for mathematics at the end of key stage 2 last year, outcomes still remained below the national average. You and the early years leader have focused on children when they enter school. Leaders have worked on the transition of pupils from pre-schools to Reception. Children in Reception are making good progress. The percentage of children achieving a good level of development has been above the national average for the past two years. Teachers in Years 1 and 2 are following pupils’ progress more carefully. In particular, they are tracking the children who were exceeding the early learning goals. Teachers are making sure that the most able continue to achieve well at key stage 1. There were exceptional circumstances for the pupils with low ability who did not achieve well in the tests at the end of key stage 1. We discussed each pupil and what had happened. Their progress in Year 3 is closely monitored. Some pupils are making rapid progress as a result of the extra support they are receiving. Some pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities are making better and steady progress because of the understanding of their needs. This is more realistic progress for these pupils and bodes well for the future. You have high expectations for teachers and these are very clear. You have emphasised that teachers must be secure in their knowledge of the current curriculum. You have invested in training to support teachers. You expect teachers to plan learning according to pupils’ different abilities. You look for challenge in activities. You are aware that there is still some work to do on this for a few teachers. You and the wider leadership team check teachers’ planning and pupils’ work relentlessly. You have ensured that teachers follow the teaching and learning policy. They provide problems for pupils to solve in the next steps in their learning. However, sometimes, teachers are not checking pupils’ answers or next steps well enough. This lack of reflection and revision is hampering the progress of a few pupils. There is more work on problem-solving and reasoning in mathematics taking place recently. The two leaders of mathematics are working on university research projects to improve teaching in this subject. These focus on bespoke programmes for learners. This is working well for disadvantaged pupils. There are plans to share this learning with other groups and build on its success. Teachers are using more precise language in mathematics. This helps pupils to articulate their learning. Pupils learn to use the correct mathematical vocabulary. As a result, pupils are more fluent in their written explanations. You want this precision in language to continue in mathematics. You expect to see it in reading and writing too. The number of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is approximately 20% of each year group. There is an increase in the number of disadvantaged pupils as well. We looked at the success of their support. The SENCo has been in post for two years. She is very experienced, especially in helping pupils who have emotional and mental health issues. She works effectively with other agencies. The leader in charge of disadvantaged pupils plans meticulously. She evaluates actions and is not afraid to change course as necessary. This is important as each pupil is unique. Lunchtime clubs provide a settled place for pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities and disadvantaged pupils to go. Around 50% of these pupils attend. They build on their skills in these sessions. As a result, their learning is progressing well. Next steps for the school Leaders and those responsible for governance should ensure that teachers: use language and teaching methodologies accurately check on the precision of pupils’ responses consistently have the highest expectations of what pupils can achieve, especially the most able and the most able disadvantaged pupils use policies and processes systematically so that progress is more rapid.

St Mary's Church of England Primary School Parent Reviews



unlock % Parents Recommend This School
Strongly Agree 79% Agree 17% Disagree 4% Strongly Disagree 0% Don't Know 0% {"strongly_agree"=>79, "agree"=>17, "disagree"=>4, "strongly_disagree"=>0, "dont_know"=>0} Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019
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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

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Figures based on 70 responses up to 14-05-2019

Responses taken from Ofsted Parent View

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